Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way)

Sue Macy

You are here: Home - Uncategorized - Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way)


Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way)

Wheels of Change How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way Take a lively look at women s history from aboard a bicycle which granted females the freedom of mobility and helped empower women s liberation Through vintage photographs advertisements cartoons

  • Title: Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way)
  • Author: Sue Macy
  • ISBN: 9781426307621
  • Page: 493
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Take a lively look at women s history from aboard a bicycle, which granted females the freedom of mobility and helped empower women s liberation Through vintage photographs, advertisements, cartoons, and songs, Wheels of Change transports young readers to bygone eras to see how women used the bicycle to improve their lives Witty in tone and scrapbook like in presentationTake a lively look at women s history from aboard a bicycle, which granted females the freedom of mobility and helped empower women s liberation Through vintage photographs, advertisements, cartoons, and songs, Wheels of Change transports young readers to bygone eras to see how women used the bicycle to improve their lives Witty in tone and scrapbook like in presentation, the book deftly covers early and comical objections, influence on fashion, and impact on social change inspired by the bicycle, which, according to Susan B Anthony, has done to emancipate women than anything else in the world NCSS Notable Social Studies Trade Books in the Field of Social Studies 2012School Library Journal Best Books of 2011Finalist YALSA Excellence in Non Fiction for Young AdultsSLJ s 100 Magnificent Children s Books of 2011Amelia Bloomer List

    • õ Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way) || ✓ PDF Download by ↠ Sue Macy
      493 Sue Macy
    • thumbnail Title: õ Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way) || ✓ PDF Download by ↠ Sue Macy
      Posted by:Sue Macy
      Published :2018-06-04T19:49:18+00:00

    One thought on “Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way)

    1. Kathryn on said:

      "Let me tell you what I think of bicycling. I think it has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. I stand and rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel." -- Susan B. Anthony, February 2nd, 1896. Though Ms. Anthony was too advanced in years by the time the cycling craze came about to ride one herself, she saw in it a grand advancement for women's rights as the bicycle led them to more freedom of mind, body and spirit. This, then, is the story of how women "rode t [...]

    2. Krista the Krazy Kataloguer on said:

      Wow. I had no idea that bicycles had such a profound effect upon American society. This book opened my eyes. Bicycles were cheaper than horses, so more people had transportation, especially women. Because of bicycles, a movement began to pave roads for smoother and less hazardous rides. (And here I thought the automobile started that.) Because of bicycles, women began to adopt more comfortable styles of dress, such as bloomers and shorter skirts. (And here I thought these were just styles adopte [...]

    3. Carol on said:

      I was absolutely delighted by Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way). Of course there are other books that outline the history of the bicycle but the unique quality of Macy’s is her look at how it changed and shaped the woman’s world in the 1800’s wheeling us right into the present day. I was surprised to see that our library is the only library that owns this book in the state of Connecticut and that’s a shame as there is a lot to b [...]

    4. Katie on said:

      Bicycle history and first-wave feminism are deftly woven into a five-chapter narrative tracing the impact of the "silent steed" on 19th-century America. The historical tour begins in the 1870s, when Albert Pope imported the bicycle industry from England, and then navigates the social commentary of the 1890s concerning women on bicycles. Next the book delves into the significant fashion changes wrought by this new form of transportation and the daring exploits of the first female competitive cycl [...]

    5. Sesana on said:

      Brief, with plenty of illustrations, Wheels of Change ended up being a much more interesting read than I had thought it would. Macy argues that the bicycle, with its inherent freedom of movement and the freedom of clothing that successfully riding one required, was an important factor in the women's movement at the time. It makes immediate sense, of course. For most young women, this would have been their first and only taste of freedom, something that they would have been unwilling to entirely [...]

    6. Ms. McCall on said:

      An easy-to-read, colorful and heavily illustrated nonfictional read, Wheels of Change provides a fresh, new take on the history of the bicycle and how important an instrument it was in helping women break out of their gender roles as early as the mid 1800s. The book is organized chronologically, although I did tend to find when it came to national and international competitive races nearing the end that it was difficult to comprehend the time frame. Wheels of Change uses straightforward vocabul [...]

    7. Betsy on said:

      A history book for kids can do any number of things. It can concentrate on a topic that has been well-documented in adult books, synthesizing and simplifying the text so that a 10-year-old could understand what is written there. Or it can do original research, never seen before on the adult page, culling from a variety of sources and coming up with something wholly new. The former nonfiction history book is pretty common. Even bestsellers like An Inconvenient Truth and Fast Food Nation end up wi [...]

    8. Rebecca Binks on said:

      Wheels of Change was a finalist in the Excellence in Young Adult Nonfiction category for YALSA-ALA in 2011. It uses blended-narrative form to reveal the impact that the bicycle has had on the lives of women. Women today take a lot of their freedoms for granted, but the bicycle was key in terms of both increase self-reliant mobility and less restrictive clothing for women. Many would be shocked to know that the bicycle was initially considered to lead girls “into paths that lead directly to sin [...]

    9. Barbara on said:

      This is an incredibly informative book that is a treat to read. I've always been a history buff despite the dearth of material on women in the history books I studied in school. Had I been lucky enough to have seen this book as a middle grader, I would have snapped it up. Macy shows how the invention and subsequent popularity of the bicycle led to more freedom for women. Suddenly, women were able to move from place to place on their own, and with that mobility came a need for more freedom, often [...]

    10. Caitlin on said:

      Wheels of Change is a relatively short, fun look at the history of cycling in the United States and how the bicycling craze contributed to the movement for women's independence. There are only a few chapters and they deal with the history of the bicycle including the move to mass manufacture them via Alexander Pope and the Columbia Bicycling company, the ways in which women became involved in riding bicycles and the freedom that this added mobility gave them, some of the challenges faced by wome [...]

    11. Cynda on said:

      Apparently written for young people with many graphics and shortness of text. Despite it being written for young oeople, the book is informative. I had no idea of how much freedom a bicycle allowed women and how it changed their lives and the experience and changed the social experience. Women could go to the market, fetch the doctor, meet up with friends, especially as roads were improved to accommodate the bicyclists, roads that also benefitted others, such as farmers carrying their goods to m [...]

    12. Heidi on said:

      There are plenty of bright spots in this piece, like the forward written by World Bicycle Relief co-founder Leah Missbach Day and the graphic quality of photographs, advertisements, and illustrations; my rating relates to the sometimes unfriendly page breaks, placement of features, and the book's overall coherence. Although I loved the idea of the infographic toward the end, I wish it had synthesized the book’s premise that the bicycle and women’s freedom are interrelated.

    13. Anastasia on said:

      This is such a great little book. It's billed as a kids' book, but I don't really think it is one. It's a great, short history of the intersection between women's history and the rise of the bicycle. The section on racing and long distance cycling records set by women was my favorite part. I can't believe how many miles some of those women rode (one woman did a century [100 miles] EVERY day for 20 days in a row!).

    14. Suzette Kunz on said:

      This is a fun history of women and bicycling. Macy makes the point that bicycles offered women more freedom and tied in with other changes in women's rights. This quote was funny: "I can't see but that a wheel (bike) is just as good company as most husbands. I would as well talk to one inanimate object as another; and I'd a great deal rather talk to one that can't answer than one that won't."

    15. Jennifer on said:

      I appreciated the slightly cheeky tone, colorful design, and short, meaty chapters of this unusual history book. Teen girls will find the section where health professionals of the day were concerned that “the shape of the bicycle seat, or saddle, could damage or overstimulate the pelvis” particularly amusing:)

    16. Kirstin on said:

      As a bicyclist who loves the feel of the wind in my hair and the burning sensation in my legs on a good uphill, I enjoyed this spunky look at the history of the bicycle. That alone was worth the read. Even more delightful was its examination of how the bicycle led to ever-increasing freedom for women.

    17. Jordan Funke on said:

      First of all, it's a great theme, one that I never would have guessed. It's also beautiful. Graphics, layout, and text work together so nicely. I consider myself fairly well-educated about this period in history and I still learned a lot. The level is perfect for middle school or lower high school and is interesting enough and visually appealing enough to hold students' interest.

    18. Katy on said:

      A National Geographic Book.It has the look of a magazine, with great vintage pictures and good writing.Just a short history of the bicycle and the influence on women during its heyday.I never thought of my bicycle this way before.

    19. laura on said:

      Let me tell you what I think of bicycling. I think it has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. I stand and rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel.” -Susan B. Anthony

    20. Edward Sullivan on said:

      Fascinating history that links the rising popularity of bicycles with women's struggle for equality.

    21. Patricia on said:

      Five chapters trace the history of the invention of the bicycle, and its relationship to women's demand for equality. Alongside the chapters, and embedded within them, are five features which with copious illustrations treat celebrity cyclists, slang, songs, press and advertising especially through the use of posters.Macy has done her research and included many revealing quotes from the media which prove the slow progress and steady resistance to women's rights. Sources, resources and a timeline [...]

    22. Mark McGinty on said:

      The celebration of International Women’s Day 2011, a global day to recognize the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future, is perhaps a perfect time to look at how the bicycle changed women’s lives in the late 19th Century and helped them ride to freedom. Sue Macy and National Geographic bring us Wheels of Change, an excellent full-color book on the history of the bicycle’s impact on society and the lives of women. To men, the bicycle was a toy but to w [...]

    23. Amanda Wall on said:

      Pairing: Because of the large numbers of female teenagers seeing the movie Fast and the Furious 6, I chose the nonfiction book Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (with a Few Flat Tires Along the Way). This book details how the invention of the bicycle in the 19th century allowed women a huge measure of freedom. The bicycle allowed women to travel freely and independently. Its invention even began changing women’s fashion. Book CitationMacy, Sue. Wheels of Change: How Wome [...]

    24. Rebecca H. on said:

      This weekend I had the pleasure of reading a book about women and cycling called Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way) by Sue Macy. It’s a wonderful book. It’s a fast read, at only 96 pages with lots of pictures and not a lot of text; it’s aimed at a young adult market, but great for anybody interested in the subject.The pictures themselves were wonderful: pictures of cool old bicycles, of old advertisements for bikes and cycling gear [...]

    25. Lauren Stoolfire on said:

      In this book, Macy details the history of bicycles from the 1880s to 1900 in the context of women’s rights, freedom, and societal restrictions. She discusses the invention of the bicycle in its different styles leading up to what we are presently familiar with and how women became key riders in the wheel craze which opened up opportunities available to them. In relation, she also discusses how cycling began to have an effect on clothing styles for women. The bicycle presented freedom of transp [...]

    26. David on said:

      Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way) by Sue Macy is a look at women's history regarding the bicycle, which granted females the freedom of mobility and helped empower women's liberation. Wheels of Change transports young readers into the past to see how women used the bicycle to improve their lives. The book deftly covers early (and comical) objections, influence on fashion, and impact on social change inspired by the bicycle. The scrapbook [...]

    27. Ed on said:

      Macy, Sue. (2011). Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way). Washington D.C.: National Geographic. 96 pp. ISBN 978-1-4263-0761-4 (Hard Cover); $18.95. Impeccable research, vintage archival images, and an engaging narrative flow characterize Macy’s scintillating and often humorous look at how the bicycle pumps up our view of women in our society. I especially enjoy the long list of “don’ts” for women wheelers in the Omaha Daily Bee. “ [...]

    28. Veronica on said:

      Do you remember the freedom you felt once you were old enough to get a two-wheeled bike and allowed to zoom around your neighborhood? Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat tires Along the Way) by Sue Macy recalls when women first got their own set of wheels and set off unescorted into the world.And that whole unescorted thing really ticked off conservatives at the time. As Macy notes in chapter 2, The Devil's Advance Agent, in the late 1800s women and men dated [...]

    29. Wendy Nelson on said:

      Junior BooksWheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to FreedomMacy, S Emmett, J Hiscott, J Epstein, L Ittner, M Olesin, K Hill, G & Bassford, L. R. (2011). Wheels of change: how women rode the bicycle to freedom (with a few flat tires along the way). Washington, D.C.: National Geographic.YALSA Finalist, SLJ Best Book of 2011One of the most interesting ways to study history is to view it through a particular lens or device--in this case, the invention and evolution of the bicycle. The bi [...]

    30. Heather on said:

      Why are the two books released in 2010 related to women and cycling both classified as children's books? This book is pretty great, and I suspect would be equally educational and otherwise valuable to most adults. The research is top-notch (I discovered something I could use in my thesis, so I know it's good material!), the writing done well, the design interesting, and the illustrations rich.A couple of very minor complaints: some of the background illustrations are placed in such a way that ma [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *