Witches and Neighbors: The Social and Cultural Context of European Witchcraft

Robin Briggs

You are here: Home - Uncategorized - Witches and Neighbors: The Social and Cultural Context of European Witchcraft


Witches and Neighbors: The Social and Cultural Context of European Witchcraft

Witches and Neighbors The Social and Cultural Context of European Witchcraft Witches and Neighbors is a remarkable interpretation of the course and causes of the fear and persecution of witches that bedeviled Europe for centuries Robin Briggs draws on the latest research into

  • Title: Witches and Neighbors: The Social and Cultural Context of European Witchcraft
  • Author: Robin Briggs
  • ISBN: 9780140144383
  • Page: 247
  • Format: Paperback
  • Witches and Neighbors is a remarkable interpretation of the course and causes of the fear and persecution of witches that bedeviled Europe for centuries Robin Briggs draws on the latest research into the local realities underlying the phenomenon In particular, he employs his own extensive work in the rich archives hidden away in the area in Europe in which so many casesWitches and Neighbors is a remarkable interpretation of the course and causes of the fear and persecution of witches that bedeviled Europe for centuries Robin Briggs draws on the latest research into the local realities underlying the phenomenon In particular, he employs his own extensive work in the rich archives hidden away in the area in Europe in which so many cases became known Who were the witches What were their practices Who believed in them What was their place in society Why, exactly, were they feared And how were they accused, tried, and executed Robin Briggs attempts to answer these questions But he goes one step further than simply looking at the persecutions themselves he focuses on the society in which perceived witchcraft existed Wiches and Neighbors is an illuminating social and cultural history of a period all too often darkened by myth and misinformation.

    • [PDF] ↠ Unlimited õ Witches and Neighbors: The Social and Cultural Context of European Witchcraft : by Robin Briggs ↠
      247 Robin Briggs
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ↠ Unlimited õ Witches and Neighbors: The Social and Cultural Context of European Witchcraft : by Robin Briggs ↠
      Posted by:Robin Briggs
      Published :2018-06-22T02:30:05+00:00

    One thought on “Witches and Neighbors: The Social and Cultural Context of European Witchcraft

    1. Katherine Addison on said:

      For most of this book, I was planning to blog about it and say basically, "This is a pretty good book." And then I hit the last chapter and the evolutionary psychology and no. He lost all the good will he'd built up and I started yelling.LEAVING THAT ASIDE, this is a pretty good book. It is interesting and helpful because it is a comparison of witchhunts in various countries, and since I don't know very much about European witchhunts except what "everybody knows," I found the material fascinatin [...]

    2. Mary Catelli on said:

      An in-depth look at the belief and trials and conditions of the witch crazeHow the confession told of making pacts, about the sabbat and how hierarchical it was, with the demons all ordered and the witches too, by wealth as they were in real life, so the poor witches arrived on brooms and rich ones on carriages, and the food was horrible (or possibly totally illusionary, you were hungry when you went home) and the common practice was to produce hail and so ruin crops.The Devil was said to promis [...]

    3. Victoria on said:

      This book is on a reading list for the class I TA, so the copy I read has evidently been used by a whole generation of undergrads, with the marginalia to prove it. On the page facing the conclusion is a drawing of Harry Potter, with the caption: "today is my birthday!" Conclusion: undergrads are ridiculous, and this book is very brightly coloured as a result.Argues that there was no culture of the occult in early modern Europe, but that witchcraft was instead a construct that was culturally loca [...]

    4. Kate on said:

      I borrowed this book from a friend, and I do appreciate the loan: it has a lot of good ideas, and I learned a lot from reading it. However, the prose was too opaque, and the organization too repetitive, to make it a fulfilling read. Witches and Neighbors seems to be Robin Briggs' entry into an ongoing discussion about the causes and effects of European "witchcraft." I had the impression that he was inspired to write partially by the modern neopagan movements: several times he points out that the [...]

    5. Hotavio on said:

      Witches and Neighbors covers the witch phenomenon in Europe and New England particularly at its height in the 16th and 17th century. Robin Briggs outlines the supernatural claims made by those accused of witchcraft. He further identifies these witches as part of a large equation, using a motif of small villages where there exists a web of dependency amongst peasants, land owners, nobleman, clergy, and, in many areas, the incipient state. Briggs further heavily weighs the psychological and sociol [...]

    6. John on said:

      This is the witch book to read if you want a ground-up, common peoples' history of witchcraft belief. Anecdote heavy. One good way to read this would be to just skim it, dipping into the brief example stories whenever you want - you'll get a lot of interesting glimpses of little moments in European village life, moments that led to accusations of witchcraft. Briggs basically believes that small town social life is what witchcraft is all about. These sorts of beliefs exist everywhere people live [...]

    7. Kaesa on said:

      I enjoyed reading this book, and there were lots of interesting examples to back up the broader generalizations about witchcraft beliefs. I came to realize that a lot of things I thought I knew about belief in witches were actually wrong. I found it really interesting that the confessions pretty much all followed a standard pattern, the same way folklore and modern urban legends do -- partly because back then Everyone Knew what witches did the same way Everyone Knows now what happens to alien ab [...]

    8. J.M. Hushour on said:

      Less fun than its thematic brethren, but only because Briggs takes a much more sociological approach. As he admits at one point, it is almost impossible to recreate what people actually thought in their heads about things like witches and witchcraft, which Briggs dismisses outright as a "fiction". He then spends most of the volume attempting to situate those beliefs culturally and psychologically.This isn't a history of witchcraft, but much more a history of the perception of witchcraft and that [...]

    9. Dr. A. on said:

      This is a good survey on the topic of withcraft, especially with regard to how it fits into the social context. Briggs doesn't develop the topic wholly, likely because his intended audience would not receive it well. For basic information this is a great start, for more information this book should be coupled with other works including Mary Murphy's much debated early work, and works by Richard Kieckhefer, Norman Cohn, and Carlo Ginzberg. Additionally, placing this contextually alongside other H [...]

    10. James on said:

      A little muddled at the time I read it, but I was in high school and it could've just been me. Did not find this all that fascinating, however.

    11. Greg Chapman on said:

      A very imformative insight into the possible reasons/causes behind the witchcraft craze of the middle ages.

    12. David on said:

      A very thorough, very dry investigation of the European witch trials. Well cited. Would be good for reference.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *