Teaming with Microbes: A Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web

Jeff Lowenfels Wayne Lewis

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Teaming with Microbes: A Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web

Teaming with Microbes A Gardener s Guide to the Soil Food Web Smart gardeners know that soil is anything but an inert substance Healthy soil is teeming with life not just earthworms and insects but a staggering multitude of bacteria fungi and other microorgan

  • Title: Teaming with Microbes: A Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web
  • Author: Jeff Lowenfels Wayne Lewis
  • ISBN: 9780881927771
  • Page: 418
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Smart gardeners know that soil is anything but an inert substance Healthy soil is teeming with life not just earthworms and insects, but a staggering multitude of bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms When we use chemical fertilizers, we injure the microbial life that sustains healthy plants, and thus become increasingly dependent on an arsenal of artificial substaSmart gardeners know that soil is anything but an inert substance Healthy soil is teeming with life not just earthworms and insects, but a staggering multitude of bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms When we use chemical fertilizers, we injure the microbial life that sustains healthy plants, and thus become increasingly dependent on an arsenal of artificial substances, many of them toxic to humans as well as other forms of life But there is an alternative to this vicious circle to garden in a way that strengthens, rather than destroys, the soil food web the complex world of soil dwelling organisms whose interactions create a nurturing environment for plants By eschewing jargon and overly technical language, the authors make the benefits of cultivating the soil food web available to a wide audience, from devotees of organic gardening techniques to weekend gardeners who simply want to grow healthy, vigorous plants without resorting to chemicals.

    Teaming with Microbes The Organic Gardener s Guide to the Teaming with Microbes The Organic Gardener s Guide to the Soil Food Web, Revised Edition Jeff Lowenfels, Wayne Lewis on FREE shipping on qualifying offers The Garden Writers of America Gold Award for Best Writing Book proves soil is anything but an inert substance Healthy soil is teeming with life not just earthworms and insects Teaming with Microbes The Organic Gardener s Guide to the Teaming with Microbes The Organic Gardener s Guide to the Soil Food Web, Revised Edition Science for Gardeners Kindle edition by Wayne Lewis, Jeff Lowenfels Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Teaming with Microbes The Organic Gardener s Guide to the Soil Food Web, Microbes Cheese Science Toolkit Microbes Microorganisms found in cheese are responsible for much of the uniqueness and character that we all know and love Salts Don t Kill Plants or Microbes Garden Myths The idea that salts kill plants and microbes seems very prevalent, especially among organic growers The topic is poorly understood and leads to a number of statements that are either false or mostly false. The CannaGrow Expo August , Palm Springs, CA The CannaGrow Expo is open to all, , and is intended for cannabis growers, grow managers, extractors, and grow enthusiasts to explore the latest cannabis Compost Tea provides no real benefits Garden Myths Compost Tea has become a very popular topic The following is a quote from Fine Gardening ref Gardeners all know compost is terrific stuff. Microbe Organics Back to Contents The Mini Microbulator Airlift Microbial Extrapolator Aerated Compost Tea Maker US Patent B Ask at KIS Organics Watch this video to see the bioreactor in operation and to learn how to use it. HelpfulGardener Gardening Forum HOMESTEADING FORUM Topics Posts Last post Chickens Ducks, Goats, and other Livestock Forum A forum for the discussion of the care and maintenance topics related to raising chickens, ducks, goats and other animals. What makes blackberries sweet HelpfulGardener What makes blackberries sweet I have about thornless blackberry plants in my garden They have always done well, producing large berries

    • Best Download [Jeff Lowenfels Wayne Lewis] ¾ Teaming with Microbes: A Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web || [Travel Book] PDF ↠
      418 Jeff Lowenfels Wayne Lewis
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Jeff Lowenfels Wayne Lewis] ¾ Teaming with Microbes: A Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web || [Travel Book] PDF ↠
      Posted by:Jeff Lowenfels Wayne Lewis
      Published :2018-07-23T22:22:37+00:00

    One thought on “Teaming with Microbes: A Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web

    1. Oldroses on said:

      (This review was originally written for The Garden Bloggers' Book club)After slogging my way through the last book I read, I was disheartened to read in the Preface to Teaming with Microbes: A Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web that the first part of the book would be difficult to get through. I pressed on. Very science-y. An excellent sleep inducer. No joke. I did fall asleep while reading it one warm afternoon. But it was definitely worth it. Like the authors, I urge you to read the entire [...]

    2. Paula on said:

      Should be required readingThis book should be required reading for every gardener. It is a guide to nurturing plants the way Mother Nature intended, through cooperation with the natural order. The symbiotic relationships that plants have with their neighbors and dependents is a beautiful system that will inspire us all to be better stewards over whatever land we take into our care.

    3. Emily on said:

      I really enjoyed this book and will work to implement many of the ideas in this book into my own yard. Here are a few things I wrote down to remember:A mere teaspoon of good garden soil contains a billion invisible bacteria, several yards of equally invisible fungal hyphae, several thousand protozoa and a few dozen nematodes. Pg. 19Root exudates are in the form of carbohydrates (including sugars) and proteins. Amazingly, their presence wakes up, attracts and grows specific beneficial bacteria an [...]

    4. Tinea on said:

      What a phenomenal book! Soil science for lay people, soil science for chemistry-phobes, soil science tailored and sifted for direct usefulness for gardeners. Lowenfels and Lewis do not shy away or dilute the science. They use the words, they draw the symbols, they do the math. But they simplify. They explain. They cut out the extraneous information that overwhelms would-be agronomists like me who literally had all the credits for an environmental science degree save chemistry, and walked without [...]

    5. Michael on said:

      The book is informative and readable with great illustrations. The soil science is rudimentary, but the discussions of the soil food web are well done. Some of the taxonomy is a bit dated but good enough for non-specialists. The section on actively aerated compost tea is excellent and that on compost is quite adequate. I do have some quibbles with the pH recommendations and think the authors may have given too much weight to the pH buffering effects of both bacteria and fungi. Maximum nutrient a [...]

    6. Erica on said:

      I think most of us see soil as the neutral backdrop against which all the "action" of plant growth takes place. Far from it, the ground beneath us is a veritable metropolis of creatures frenetically eating each other and producing valuable nutrients for their neighbors and plants. That this ecosystem has been so wholely ignored and decimated by modern industrial agriculture is frightening. Never fear though -- these microorganisms, neatly summarized here in short chapters for the soil science ne [...]

    7. Georgia Gross on said:

      I recently have renewed my garden from a giant dog potty to a place where one can sit and enjoy the scenery. This slim book is packed with information about composting, undersoil critters, and the benefits of renewing the earth. With lots of pictures and clearly written for the beginning gardener, this is a terrific guide though the science of dirt.

    8. Justin on said:

      This seems more for the professional than the amateur gardener. Lots of good details but not interesting to me.

    9. Alysha Thompson on said:

      I have taken quite a few college science courses, which made the reading pretty easy but I have a hard time seeing a personal without this background get through some of the stickier sections in the book. Teaming with Microbes provides excellent detail and microbiology background. There philosophy has a “going green” approach which I appreciate and wish to try on my own future lawn and garden, although I am not sure how well things will take in the short growing season up in northern North D [...]

    10. Barry on said:

      One of the most important books I've ever read. It's not easy for a nonscientist to understand quickly, partly because a certain amount of chemical and biological terms are needed (Latin and Greek helped me, but not everyone has the benefit of a thoroughly anachronistic education), but also because the sequence of ideas are not always sequentially presented in a paragraph. All the same, the book presents fairly recent research by Dr. Ingham of Oregon Sate U. on the tiniest critters beneath your [...]

    11. Lalena on said:

      This is a great intro to the idea of gardening as a form of eco-system management instead of chemistry. The rules they lay out and explain can be incorporated by anyone regardless of climate. However, since they are located in Alaska all of the examples given are based on a more northern climate. I'm in Texas and we are in the middle of an extreme drought, so some of the advice about lawn care (i.e. grass) makes no sense to me at all right now. I'm not wasting any water on grass. So you may need [...]

    12. Owen on said:

      i love a book that gets me to think of bacteria and fungi as little bags of fertilizer. and then along come the protazoa and nematodes to release that fertilizer as manure right in the root zone, or the rhizosphere. love it. my inner ecology/farm nerd gives this book two green thumbs up. if you garden, you should read this book.

    13. Reiden on said:

      I started this book just before taking a college level soil class, and it ended up being a great supplement to the class material. I learned quite a bit about the importance of microorganisms and how to aid their proliferation with compost tea. This book completely changed how I look at my own yard/garden, and how I will manage it moving forward.

    14. David Koblos on said:

      The more life there is in the soil, and the greater its diversity, the better it is for the plants, for the ecosystem, including the gardener. This much I knew. But this amazing book goes so much further: it talks about bacterially or fungally dominates soils, pH levels, and which type of plants plants prefer which. A lot of science, brought down to the gardener's perspective.

    15. Mike Moskos on said:

      Really comprehensive. You probably can pick up everything in this book on the internet in a few hours (and I probably have). But, reading the whole book makes it sink in.

    16. Joanne McKinnon on said:

      Finally!For years I wondered and searched for answers. Found plenty of surface information but I needed more. Teaming with Microbes not only answered my questions, it also explained why they work. I’m already applying my new knowledge to my garden. It’s also a relief that I was on the right path. I stopped using commercial fertilizer a few years ago. Instead, I soak horsetail, stinging nettle and sometimes dandelion roots and leaves. I also prefer plant-based compost. Shredded fall leaves ar [...]

    17. Kit Veerkamp on said:

      This is one of the best books on the topic of the Soil Food Web I've read. As a Landscape Architect, Permaculture Designer and Master Gardener, the information in this book is invaluable and the presentation about as readable as more technical information can get. I learned far more from this book than from taking Elaine Ingrahm's online class, which I paid hundreds of dollars for. If you are a gardener, this is a "must read."

    18. Alex on said:

      A really great book and explanation of soil food webs and caring for soil appropriately for what you want to grow. I am wary when a book tells me to apply certain products which have to be purchased, which this book does, but otherwise it is very educational and easy to apply to any garden.

    19. Keith Short on said:

      Very informative. Now I understand the difference in results between my old locality, and new locality.This will help my yard/sustainability, and give back some time in the long run.

    20. Chris Hinman on said:

      A must for any gardenerA book to save the planet! But also help grow a great garden and do so organically. What else is left to say

    21. Missy Ivey on said:

      Very good information! Just a little hard to read. Some parts of the book were over my head.

    22. Kevin Goff on said:

      Gives a new perspective on your gardenGreat book, the first half covers the soil biology to a degree that some may consider boring, but to me really opened up the door to learning about the vast complexity of the ecosystems underground, and what makes them thrive.Only thing I wish they had gone into detail more on was the compost teas; They talk briefly about cell counts in varying teas but dont show how to extrapolste that by using a microscope (yes some people are that into this). They even en [...]

    23. Tymmaaaay on said:

      Great resource to understanding how gardens work. Lots of good information.

    24. Jenn on said:

      This is another one for the reference library. I found it highly enlightening. It's not just 'dirt' beneath our feet but a microcosm of activity. The earth is alive with bacteria, fungus, nematodes, centipedes, springtails, worms, ants and any number of other living creatures, most of which help in some way to support plant life. It's an amazing feat of symbiotic "love" between this microscopic world of 'bugs' and the plants they live with. I would suggest to anyone considering taking up gardeni [...]

    25. Carlie on said:

      Dirt is full of all kinds of tiny "critters" we can't see. Nature is best left undisturbed. Compost is good. There, now you know most of the book's secrets. I wanted to like this book waaaay more than I did. I can't remember where I heard about it (maybe at a composting and soils lecture?) but I think it was a long while ago and the intervening time amped up my expectations. The book is fine, no major issues, I think I was hoping it would be more fun to read, more filled with inspiring informati [...]

    26. Chris on said:

      This is a great little entertaining mix of popular science and gardening know-how. The first part is an introduction to the soil food web, which I suspect people who read this book for the gardening tips found boring, but if you're into science at all you'd probably love it. Sure, plants are green things with parts above the ground, but they really dominate under the dirt, attracting and controlling an entire microbe and animal ecology for their own benefit. You get to learn about nematodes, art [...]

    27. Clivemichael on said:

      Well put together primer on soil web health. Simple (and complex) language describes process and practice, most everything needed to understand and proceed. diagrams and pictures included.

    28. Carla on said:

      This book has really vital gardening information on a topic many people are not familiar with-the life in their soil. It has a forward by Elaine Ingham, the guru of soil science, and it is easy to understand. The part I don't like is that the authors spend the first part of the book cajolling you to PLEASE read through the science stuff, we know its not exciting but you really need to know it. C'mon guys, I'm reading your book because I want to know this stuff, I'm not a child! But that somewhat [...]

    29. David on said:

      Het heeft mij een aantal maanden gekost om dit boek volledig door te lezen. Toch is het een boeiend boek dat een relatief onbekende wereld beschrijft. Het boek is opgedeeld in twee delen. Het eerste deel is eerder theoretisch, behandelt de klassieke bodemwetenschap en vervolgens alle componenten (oftewel bewoners) van een gezond bodemvoedselweb. Het tweede deel is meer praktijkgericht en beschrijft hoe je het bodemvoedselweb in jouw tuin kan gebruiken. Deze opdeling vind ik wel geslaagd, maar je [...]

    30. Eric on said:

      Compost Teas, the relationship of fungi, bacteria, and pH. Plant preferences for fungi/low pH or bacterial/high pH soil. Surface areas of soil texture (silt, clay, sand, loam). Cation Exchange Sites, the more of them there are the more capable the plants of getting the nutrients it needs. Endo- and ectomycorrhizal fungi symbiotic relationships with roots—getting difficult to reach nutrients (phosphorus) and increasing surface area for nutrient absorption. Ammonium, nitrates, and nitrite—rela [...]

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