Broken: A Love Story - Horses, Humans, and Redemption on the Wind River Indian Reservation

Lisa Jones

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Broken: A Love Story - Horses, Humans, and Redemption on the Wind River Indian Reservation

Broken A Love Story Horses Humans and Redemption on the Wind River Indian Reservation Freelance journalist Jones tells the story of Arapaho medicine man Stanford Addison a quadriplegic and gifted horse trainer and his effect on animals The horses would gather around their liquid brow

  • Title: Broken: A Love Story - Horses, Humans, and Redemption on the Wind River Indian Reservation
  • Author: Lisa Jones
  • ISBN: 9781416579069
  • Page: 190
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Freelance journalist Jones tells the story of Arapaho medicine man Stanford Addison, a quadriplegic and gifted horse trainer and his effect on animals The horses would gather around, their liquid brown eyes fixed on him Publishers Weekly

    • Best Read [Lisa Jones] ☆ Broken: A Love Story - Horses, Humans, and Redemption on the Wind River Indian Reservation || [Ebooks Book] PDF Â
      190 Lisa Jones
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Lisa Jones] ☆ Broken: A Love Story - Horses, Humans, and Redemption on the Wind River Indian Reservation || [Ebooks Book] PDF Â
      Posted by:Lisa Jones
      Published :2018-04-05T14:21:38+00:00

    One thought on “Broken: A Love Story - Horses, Humans, and Redemption on the Wind River Indian Reservation

    1. Jacqie on said:

      I have mixed feelings about this book. The author started out writing a magazine piece about a crippled horse trainer and parlayed it into a book. For her research, she returned again and again to the reservation on which the trainer lived. She writes affectingly about the poverty and endurance of the people on the reservation. She also gets herself into some trouble because of her poor boundaries.Jones is at her best exploring the issues of white privilege. I could take or leave some of the mys [...]

    2. Cara Lee on said:

      To me, this achingly honest book is all about surrender. Lisa Jones set out to write a magazine article about a quadriplegic Native American horse gentler and spiritual healer. She ended up taking a life-changing journey through her own spiritual quest, with the healer as her guide. I felt I was riding alongside the author the entire way, and it was a heart-opening ride. The title says it all. Before he could become a healer, Stanford Addison had to be "Broken." He was a drug-dealing, womanizing [...]

    3. Elisabeth on said:

      I have to echo Alexandra Fuller, who calls this memoir "the most important and beautiful book to come out of the West in a decade." BROKEN: A LOVE STORY is a stunning debut. Lisa Jones writes about her life-changing relationship with Stanford Addison in a way that had me belly-laughing one minute, then sobbing on the floor in child's pose the next. This book has some very important things to say about women, and race, and class, and the perpetual longing for our own sense of tribe; and for this [...]

    4. Arminzerella on said:

      Lisa Jones first met Stanford Addison (a quadriplegic, Northern Arapaho, horse-breaker and healer) when she was assigned an article on his horse-breaking techniques. She found herself returning regularly, however, for the spiritual connection she felt in his presence. Eventually, she pitched the idea of a book about Stan’s life, so she could spend more time getting to know him. Broken is that book. Broken is also a lot of other things – it’s a little bit about horse-breaking, a little bit [...]

    5. Tattered Cover Book Store on said:

      Colorado author Lisa Jones set out to write a book about Stanford Addison, a quadriplegic medicine man and horse breaker who lives up in Wyoming's Wind River Indian Reservation. And certainly he was a main character (and an EXTREMELY fascinating one whose broken body freed him to soar), but "Broken" is more about Lisa herself. She finds a home, and more importantly herself, interviewing this amazing man and hanging out with his large, eclectic and somewhat wild family. She's fearless about telli [...]

    6. Lance Gideon on said:

      I had a hard time at first relating to any of the characters in this book, particularly the author who is a middle aged woman struggling with romantic relationships, and one that infused her own conflicts into the story of Stanford Addison's life. But as the book progressed, I began to appreciate Lisa Jones' personal story and its connection with the people at the center of this writing - the Arapaho tribe on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. Having her life become so intertwined with the A [...]

    7. Jackie on said:

      Colorado author Lisa Jones set out to write a book about Stanford Addison, a quadriplegic medicine man and horse breaker who lives up in Wyoming's Wind River Indian Reservation. And certainly he was a main character (and an EXTREMELY fascinating one whose broken body freed him to soar), but "Broken" is more about Lisa herself. She finds a home, and more importantly herself, interviewing this amazing man and hanging out with his large, eclectic and somewhat wild family. She's fearless about telli [...]

    8. Laura Cornish on said:

      This is a beautiful story of Lisa's journey into Arapaho culture by innocently heading up to the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming to do a story on Stanford Addison, but ends up staying on & off for 4 years to write a book about Stanford's life.This is a book that needed to be written about an amazing man. After reading the book it made me want to travel to the reservation, break a horse, and endure a sweat lodge!!This is a great read & I highly recommend reading this one!

    9. Cat on said:

      Vivid, inspiring, eye-opening, humblingis story takes place not far from where I live in Wyoming, yet so much of what goes on on the reservations is unknown or disregarded. Lisa is a hero of mine because of her ability to immerse herself into Addison's life on the Wind River Res and tell the story in such an honest and beautiful way.

    10. Luna on said:

      I loved this book. In a nutshell, the author travels to WY to interview an Arapaho medicine man/"horse whisper," and ends up staying on & off for 4 years. In the process, Lisa Jones learns a lot about the difficult life on an Indian Reservation, the magic of Stan (medicine man), and how love always triumphs over fear.

    11. Rochelle on said:

      This is an unusual story of Stanford Addison, quadriplegic Arapaho healer and horse gentler who was also a soul whisperer. Lisa heard about Stanford and after a 4-day magaxine assignment focusing on his method of working with horses, she decided to embed herself in the community, growing to love Stanford in the largest sense of the world which is to say to learn to love him as a spiritual teacher and healer, and to learn to live with her own vulnerability. It also is a look at the intersection b [...]

    12. Chris on said:

      Picked up this book at the Grand Teton National Park store in the airport at Jackson Hole. I had high hopes for deep learning about spiritual growth, horse training, Native American beliefs and life, and Wyoming history--but sadly it was a maudlin and disappointing read. Though the writing is expressive and the characters vibrant, the story quickly became directionless and mired. Hope springs eternal, however, and I kept slogging through, waiting for the Light to shine. Nope. I recommend you ste [...]

    13. Pam on said:

      I felt like I was on the reservation in Wyoming. Lisa Jones' writing takes you right into the sweat lodge, the corral, Stan's house. It's evocative and compelling and so beautifully written. Highly recommend.

    14. Margo Berendsen on said:

      I have a fascination for Wyoming, my adopted state, that this author apparently has also, because she captured part of the mystique and also added to it, which I deeply appreciated. I have driven through the Wind River Indian Reservation so many times and wondered about the stories that were hidden within it, and this book richly revealed some of those stories and pathos. I was very, very impressed with the writing. This woman can write sharp, vivid prose and dreamy prose as well. She can captur [...]

    15. Ira on said:

      I wish I could give this six stars. In fact******There.I have been a lifelong book worm (well if you don't count pre-literacy as living. And I don't.) Where was I? Oh yes. I have been a lifelong bibliophile and this is one of my favorite books. Without being too presumptuous, I would say one of the best I've ever read.I read it three years ago and have thought about it many times since. Partly, I think, it resonated very strongly with my own circumstances and experiences of personal challenge an [...]

    16. Diane on said:

      Broken: A Love Story , by Lisa Jones, is a personal journey about hope and the renewal of the spirit.Lisa Jones is sent by the magazine she works for on a four day assignment, to write a story about a quadriplegic, Arapahoe medicine man, and talented horse trainer named Stanford Addison.Addison lived on the Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming. He was injured in a tragic accident at the age of 20 that left him in a wheelchair for life.As he struggled and eventually came to accept his limitat [...]

    17. Wendy Hines on said:

      Lisa Jones went on a four day magazine assignment to the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. A Northern Arapaho, also quadriplegic, is heard to have the gift of breaking a horse without force. But not only breaking horses is his gift. He's rumored to be able to heal people, spiritually and physically.Stanford Addison spent his young life dealing drugs, romancing the girls, having a party time -- until one fateful tragic night. Waking up quadriplegic, Stanford tried to adjust to his new life, but [...]

    18. Julene Bair on said:

      What’s most remarkable about this book is not the writer’s charm, humor, and energy, inestimable and amazing as they are, but her courage. A seasoned journalist accustomed to going to great lengths for a good story, Lisa first encountered Stanford Addison while on assignment for Smithsonian magazine. Soon after, the great lengths she was traveling were within herself, as she stretched to make genuine connections with people whose lives were much more difficult than her own, but whose ways of [...]

    19. Alger on said:

      Not Read all the way through so I will refrain from giving it a rating. My deep, immediate, and personal dislike of Lisa Jones and her whining authorial voice compelled me to put this book down.I suppose there are people out there who enjoy this kind of maundering self-examination, a group I imagine that overlaps completely with people who thought Eat, Pray, Love was a book worth the paper. I think Jones thought she was doing something worthwhile, but her unqualified and entirely naive perceptio [...]

    20. Noel Bass on said:

      Yes, Yes, a love story. (clears throat) I had no choice. Whatever, a man can read a love story once in awhile. But seriously though, I was leaving for a two week trip to the Netherlands the next day and I was out of reads on Native American Reservation life. It was a Sunday, library closed, so there. This was what was at the Barnes and Noble. Okay, that being said, I'm glad I read it. Pretty much every book about reservation life is interesting to me. This story started out great but mid-way thr [...]

    21. Dale Stonehouse on said:

      It always tickles me when outsiders get to know indigenous people from the inside. The author, as most in the Western world, is skeptical of psychic abilities until she encounters Stan Addison, a quadriplegic Arapaho who breaks horses gently. Over four years the author observes first-hand Addison's abilities to see and know things in silence, at a distance, and when she would least expect it. Set on the Wind River Indian Reservation in windy central Wyoming, this book wanders at times but hits i [...]

    22. Miranda Prather on said:

      Lisa Jones' book is a personal narrative of awakening spirituality and a deeper understanding of differences and similarities between cultures, but it is also more than that.I was drawn to the book because Stan Addison was always someone I had wanted to meet to learn from about his way with horses. As a horse lover, I am always looking for more knowledge from those who are skilled in working with them. Regretfully, I never had that chance, but after reading Jones' narrative, I feel as though I a [...]

    23. Amber on said:

      The book was well written. It felt like I was back in Riverton. The end of the book took me longer to read because more detail was given to day-to-day events. It was a little more like a journal in the end. I especially liked the realization that living in a tribe is more natural and loving than living alone. This book definitely made me think about how I view the Wind River Indian Reservation and the people who live there. There is so much tragedy on the reservation. I also learned a lot more a [...]

    24. Cara Achterberg on said:

      I loved this book. The author is painfully honest about herself, her experiences, and the people she encounters. I truly felt like I knew the characters completely. The writing was poignant, open-hearted, lyrical at times, and incredibly original. This is a book I will read again. It is not a "horse" book although that breaking horses is the context for the author's first encounter with Stan who is the center of the book. It was an amazing and painful look in to the culture of native Americans. [...]

    25. Page Lambert on said:

      TODAY, reading Rosie Sultan’s debut novel Helen Keller in Love, I thought about the scene in Black Beauty when the barn catches on fire and Black Beauty’s groom covers the horse’s eyes with a scarf and leads him outside to safety. Black Beauty’s shrill whinny pierces the darkness and gives his stable mate Ginger, still trapped inside the burning barn, the courage to run through the flames. In the opening chapter of Helen Keller in Love, Helen is waiting to elope with her secretary Peter. [...]

    26. Caryn on said:

      Though this book is a memoir by a veteran journalist and recounts her life and thoughts and experiences in detail, its central character is really Stanford Addison, the Northern Arapaho medicine man/horse trainer/spiritual leader who changes her life over the course of her on-and-off visits to the tribe's Wyoming reservation. The quadriplegic, former drug addict, former womanizer Addison is a charismatic, competent and engaging protagonist and as a central figure in these pages, it is easy to se [...]

    27. Dawn Allbee on said:

      This book starts out with the author intending to write mostly about Stan Addison, a disabled Native American (Arapaho) healer and spiritual leader. Stan Addison also teaches others how to "break" in horses using a unique style. Much of this book is how exposure to this man challenges the author's view of her own philosophy and relationships. How suffering can be "good" because it opens up ones heart and mind (sometimes forcefully) to confront things she has avoided. What it means to love and th [...]

    28. Kate Lawrence on said:

      Jones' strong attraction to the Arapaho people makes this story more compelling than it would have been had she maintained a journalist's detachment. She felt instinctively that they had something to teach her, that she would find personal healing there, and she did. Because she spent as much time with the people as she did, and became personally involved in their community, she is able to portray their lives with depth and understanding. The central figure, healer Stanford Addison, is not the k [...]

    29. Janet Macdonald on said:

      I'm not sure if there is a star for 'kind of liked it' but, as always, I had much more appreciation after our group discussion. Did I feel as strongly as others or see as deeply? No.but any text that makes you think and reflect is worthwhile. The setting descriptions make one want to travel to Wyoming to view the beauty in person. Rather ironic that the horse pictured on the cover is actually from 'The Wild Horses of Sable Island'ever, there is a Nova Scotia connection within the text.

    30. Shirley on said:

      I appreciated this book especially about the value of native american spirituality. Lisa Jones somehow conveys deep respect and love for this people without glossing over the weak spots. It made me want to have a sweat lodge experience with a respected native healer. White people would do well to add this book to their diversity education. I disagree with the reviewers who thought Jones wrote too much about herself--for the report she was making was very much about herself and her experience wit [...]

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