The Hollow Hope: Can Courts Bring About Social Change?

Gerald N. Rosenberg

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The Hollow Hope: Can Courts Bring About Social Change?

The Hollow Hope Can Courts Bring About Social Change In follow up studies dozens of reviews and even a book of essays evaluating his conclusions Gerald Rosenberg s critics not to mention his supporters have spent nearly two decades debating the argum

  • Title: The Hollow Hope: Can Courts Bring About Social Change?
  • Author: Gerald N. Rosenberg
  • ISBN: 9780226726717
  • Page: 282
  • Format: Paperback
  • In follow up studies, dozens of reviews, and even a book of essays evaluating his conclusions, Gerald Rosenberg s critics not to mention his supporters have spent nearly two decades debating the arguments he first put forward in The Hollow Hope With this substantially expanded second edition of his landmark work, Rosenberg himself steps back into the fray, responding to cIn follow up studies, dozens of reviews, and even a book of essays evaluating his conclusions, Gerald Rosenberg s critics not to mention his supporters have spent nearly two decades debating the arguments he first put forward in The Hollow Hope With this substantially expanded second edition of his landmark work, Rosenberg himself steps back into the fray, responding to criticism and adding chapters on the same sex marriage battle that ask anew whether courts can spur political and social reform Finding that the answer is still a resounding no, Rosenberg reaffirms his powerful contention that it s nearly impossible to generate significant reforms through litigation The reason American courts are ineffective and relatively weak far from the uniquely powerful sources for change they re often portrayed as Rosenberg supports this claim by documenting the direct and secondary effects of key court decisions particularly Brown v Board of Education and Roe v Wade He reveals, for example, that Congress, the White House, and a determined civil rights movement did far than Brown to advance desegregation, while pro choice activists invested too much in Roe at the expense of political mobilization Further illuminating these cases, as well as the ongoing fight for same sex marriage rights, Rosenberg also marshals impressive evidence to overturn the common assumption that even unsuccessful litigation can advance a cause by raising its profile Directly addressing its critics in a new conclusion, The Hollow Hope, Second Edition promises to reignite for a new generation the national debate it sparked seventeen years ago.

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    • Best Read [Gerald N. Rosenberg] â The Hollow Hope: Can Courts Bring About Social Change? || [Manga Book] PDF ☆
      282 Gerald N. Rosenberg
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Gerald N. Rosenberg] â The Hollow Hope: Can Courts Bring About Social Change? || [Manga Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Gerald N. Rosenberg
      Published :2018-07-26T00:48:03+00:00

    One thought on “The Hollow Hope: Can Courts Bring About Social Change?

    1. Doug Clark on said:

      In The Hollow Hope, Gerald N. Rosenberg’s detailed and fascinating study of the Supreme Court, he attempts to answer the question of whether the Court, or any court, can be an effective instrument for social change. To examine this question, Rosenberg first looks at two standard views of the Court: the Constrained Court and the Dynamic Court. The Constrained Court views “the courts as weak, ineffective, and powerless.” The Dynamic Court views the courts as “powerful, vigorous, and potent [...]

    2. Adrien on said:

      Misguided, it seems, but Rosenberg is good at stringing you along within the pseudo-academic style and dredges up thought. Plus what he goes over that was already widely accepted still has worth, I think. It's repetitive, sure, and he uses dubious framing devices, but lays out very clearly, which is of no small value, considering the complexity of the subject matter.

    3. Frank Stein on said:

      In this book Rosenberg makes a well-argued case that the great Supreme Court cases of the 20th century, especially Brown v. Board of Education and Roe v. Wade, had no real substantive effect on American society.He also makes his point about the "Constrained Court" in other fields, including environmental law, legislative reapportionment, criminal procedure, and women's rights, but these are, he fully admits, sketchily examined. The heart of the book, and certainly the most convincing part, is Ro [...]

    4. Brett on said:

      It's not often, especially as I get older, that I come across a book that radically changes the way I think about something important. This is one of those few books with that kind of power.Like most of us, I grew up hearing and believing the notion that major landmark court cases were instrumental in bringing about big changes to our society. The Supreme Court is viewed by partisans of all types as wielding enormous power to restructure our institutions. Decisions like Brown v. Board of Educati [...]

    5. Lauren on said:

      Whew, so many pages, for so lazy an author! OK, first off, I actually agree with his argument, and if I were reading the first edition of this book, I might have upped the stars to 4. But this is the second edition, which was published in 2008. The first edition was published in 1991. So much has happened on all of the subjects discussed in both editions between those two dates! I know, he really wanted to make a case explaining gay marriage using his theory. Fine. But would it kill him to updat [...]

    6. Kaitlyn on said:

      I found this book to be very interesting. It presented a different perspective on the role of courts and social movements. The thesis of the book is that courts are not the catalyst for social change. Rosenberg went though and examined this through looking at various rights battles over the past century. The last section of the book examined the ongoing battle for same sex marriage and the role of the courts. The book is a little long for light reading but it was very interesting. It is an easy [...]

    7. Alex Bloom on said:

      Comprehensive. Rosenberg succeeds in persuading the reader that social change is best accomplished through means other than the Court unless particular (rare) conditions arise that allow for the Court to be an agent of change. While the thesis feels a little simplistic at times, and theoretically inclined readers might be left wanting a little more, there is no doubt that it's an impressive work.

    8. Craig on said:

      An extremely thorough examination of the limited power of the judiciary to effect social change in civil rights and other key areas. Could use a third edition to update marriage equality chapters post-Obergefell.

    9. Don on said:

      This book does an amazing job of showing the why those seeking social change should not pursue their course through the courts. I took Gerry Rosenberg's class at the U of Chicago and really enjoyed his perspective. This is a must-read for anyone involved in policy implementation.

    10. Charles on said:

      Incredibly important book, but it gets less and less persuasive every time I come back to it. I mean, I generally agree with the argument, but the actual content here suffers a bit under the weight of the many critiques that have been made over the past few decades.

    11. Lance on said:

      Great work that assesses the effectiveness of seeking social change through the courts.

    12. Brooke on said:

      Not buying the argument that courts did/do not contribute to civil rights

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