The Reformation: A History

Diarmaid MacCulloch

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The Reformation: A History

The Reformation A History The National Book Critics Circle Award winning history of the Reformation from the New York Times bestselling author of Christianity and SilenceAt a time when men and women were prepared to kill and b

  • Title: The Reformation: A History
  • Author: Diarmaid MacCulloch
  • ISBN: 9780143035381
  • Page: 271
  • Format: Paperback
  • The National Book Critics Circle Award winning history of the Reformation from the New York Times bestselling author of Christianity and SilenceAt a time when men and women were prepared to kill and be killed for their faith, the Protestant Reformation tore the Western world apart Acclaimed as the definitive account of these epochal events, Diarmaid MacCulloch s award winThe National Book Critics Circle Award winning history of the Reformation from the New York Times bestselling author of Christianity and SilenceAt a time when men and women were prepared to kill and be killed for their faith, the Protestant Reformation tore the Western world apart Acclaimed as the definitive account of these epochal events, Diarmaid MacCulloch s award winning history brilliantly re creates the religious battles of priests, monarchs, scholars, and politicians from the zealous Martin Luther and his Ninety Five Theses to the polemical John Calvin to the radical Igantius Loyola, from the tortured Thomas Cranmer to the ambitious Philip II.Drawing together the many strands of the Reformation and Counter Reformation, and ranging widely across Europe and the New World, MacCulloch reveals as never before how these dramatic upheavals affected everyday lives overturning ideas of love, sex, death, and the supernatural, and shaping the modern age.

    Reformation Sustainable Women s Clothing and Accessories Being naked is the most sustainable option Reformation is We make sustainable women s clothing and accessories Free US shipping and returns. WELCOME TO THE REFORMATION ONLINE THE MOST The Reformation began on October , , when German monk Saint Martin Luther nailed his Theses to the Castle Church door in Wittenberg, Germany. Reformation The Reformation fully the Protestant Reformation, or the European Reformation was a schism in Western Christianity initiated by Martin Luther and continued by Huldrych Zwingli, John Calvin and other Protestant Reformers in th century Europe. It is usually considered to have started with the publication of the Ninety five Theses by Martin Luther in and lasted until the end of the Reformation home A RESPONSIVE TEMPLATE DESIGNED BY DYNADOT GET STARTED Firearm Info projectile Info Reformation Sexual Abuse of Children by Protestant Ministers Protestant Reformation Information Center electronic library of resources on the Protest Reformation Christian Protestant Catholic Pope Luther Calvin Christianity Lutheran Methodist Presbyterian Anglican YOU ARE BLESSED FOR VISITING THE REFORMATION The handwriting on the wall announced the fall of ancient Babylon and the handwriting on the door announced the fall of modern Babylon. reformation the Online Magazine of the Alliance of Editorial Note This is the fifth post in a series of posts in which we have invited the authors of The Statement on Social Justice and the Gospel to expound upon the statement s affirmations and denials. The Reformation A History Diarmaid MacCulloch The National Book Critics Circle Award winning history of the Reformation from the New York Times bestselling author of Christianity At a time when men and women were prepared to kill and be killed for their faith, the Protestant Reformation tore the Western world apart. Counter Reformation The Counter Reformation Latin Contrareformatio , also called the Catholic Reformation Latin Reformatio Catholica or the Catholic Revival, was the period of Catholic resurgence initiated in response to the Protestant Reformation, beginning with the Council of Trent and ending at the close of the Thirty Years War Initiated to preserve the power, influence and material

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    One thought on “The Reformation: A History

    1. Bettie☯ on said:

      bbc/programmes/b087pr2yDescription: 500 years after the Reformation, Diarmaid MacCulloch examines how the announcement of a university seminar in Germany led to the division of Europe. He examines the ideas of Martin Luther, where they came from and why they proved so revolutionary, tracing their development and influence, and reflecting on what they mean for us today.

    2. Frank Stein on said:

      At times this book seemed like the most magisterial and thoughtful work I'd ever read on religion or early modern Europe. MacCulloch's descriptions of the Catholic Church before Luther, and of the monumental changes in life and society after Luther, are clear and beautiful examples of the history of culture and of thought, simply unparalleled in any work I've read on the subjects. The middle third of the book, however, is an impossibly confusing welter of names and dates.First, however, the good [...]

    3. Adam Snider on said:

      This is simply put the best popular history book I've ever read. The subject is the Reformation, but MacCulloch goes far beyond the traditional "Luther to Westphalia" timeline, using the first few chapters to flesh out the world of Latin Christianity as it existed during the century or so before Luther arrived on the scene. Geographically the book also extends well beyond the borders of what we often view to be the main sphere of the Reformation - Germany, France, and England - to explore how th [...]

    4. Jo Walton on said:

      This was excellent -- readable, smooth, as comprehensive and unbiased as one can hope for. I now understand a whole lot of things more clearly, and know about a host of other things of which I was ignorant. I recommend this to anyone with an interest in European intellectual and social history. I especially recommend it to anyone who ever thought the Reformation was boring but that they ought to know more about it.

    5. مروان البلوشي on said:

      لماذا مرت أوروبا بـ "الإصلاح الديني" الذي بدأه مارتن لوثر كينغ؟ ما هي نتائج هذا "الإصلاح" على العقل الأوروبي؟ وكيف غيرته للأبد. كيف تغيرت المسيحية مكانتها داخل الدول والمجتمعات الأوروبية من "الإصلاح الديني"؟كل هذه الأسئلة وغيرها الكثير وإجاباتها في هذا الكتاب العميق.

    6. Henry Sturcke on said:

      Confronted with the challenge of writing about an era too well-known, Lytton Strachey advised how the explorer of the past would proceed: “He will row out over the great ocean of material, and lower down into it, here and there, a little bucket, which will bring up to the light of day some characteristic specimen, from the far depths, to be examined with a careful curiosity.” This magisterial history of the Reformation by Diarmaid MacCulloch is a prolonged exercise in doing just that.This is [...]

    7. Lauren Albert on said:

      Magisterial. MacCulloch's scholarship is formidable. It took me a month to read and yet I never felt the urge to put it away. He gives in depth coverage to areas I've read little about despite having read a lot of books about the Reformation. One example I remember is a solid review of the Reformation in the Netherlands. It is not an easy read but it is a worthwhile one.

    8. Paul on said:

      The story of the Reformation is long and complex, and so are many of MacCulloch's sentences, but never mind. This is a rich and full account of the Reformation, in which the motivations of faith and feeling, power and practicality are woven fine, the players in the drama are presented as whole people, and the meaning of this chapter of Western cultural history is modeled "in the round." Rakow and Torda are meaningfully placed in it, as are Calvin's two foils: Michael Servetus and Marguerite de N [...]

    9. J. Dunn on said:

      I picked this up because I knew almost nothing about the Reformation, and I felt like I should at least have the basic history straight for events which were so vital to the shaping of the modern world.And, it mostly covered me for that. He did an excellent job of putting you inside the very alien worldviews and socio-cultural arrangements of the time, and illustrating just how revolutionary and sudden a change the Reformation really was. He gave engaging and detailed sketches of most of the mai [...]

    10. Thomas Achord on said:

      Lengthy and somewhat informed. I'm no expert on the Reformation, hence my reading of the book, but I have read around in theology and history. Social Backdrop:MacCulloch provides extensive social and civic background to the Reformation that is invaluable. He draws a confluence of courses all converging upon this varied yet singular event. As a social history, it is superb. He also, very wonderfully, shows how, prior to *The* Reformation, there were thousands of tiny little reformations. Monks, p [...]

    11. Laura on said:

      500 years after the Reformation, Diarmaid MacCulloch examines how the announcement of a university seminar in Germany led to the division of Europe. He examines the ideas of Martin Luther, where they came from and why they proved so revolutionary, tracing their development and influence, and reflecting on what they mean for us today.Producer: Dixi Stewartc/programmes/b087pr2y

    12. David Ozab on said:

      An excellent overview of the cataclysmic splintering of Western Christianity, The Reformation is long (700 pp) and intricate in detail, but the narrative never drags. Diarmid MacCulloch is thorough and almost always balanced in his view of both the Protestant and Catholic sides of the struggle. The only time his biases seem to show are when he discusses the English Reformation. He seems to have very little patience for the more conservative and, to be honest, catholic side of the Church of Engla [...]

    13. Christopher on said:

      This is another book that has been sitting on my shelf, unread, for some time. Now, I've finally finished reading it and I am glad that I did. Mr. MacCulloch sweeps through the Reformation with an energy and verve that is not found in many similar, one-volume accounts of history. And he is quite adept at switching between the historical, theological, and social aspects of the period that tore Western Europe apart. For those who have taken a course on modern Western history, the basic outline of [...]

    14. Tsun Lu on said:

      "A learned, enlightening and disturbing masterwork."---Michael Dirda, The Washington Post Book World. Very fun to read, good very political interpretation of the Reformation history, but don't expect to find providence or love for Church there.

    15. CJ Bowen on said:

      MacCulloch knows the words, but not the tune. Brilliant and sad.

    16. P on said:

      The most impressive popular history book I’ve read to date. MacCulloch covers western European religious movements from roughly the Avignon Papacy (1309) through the conclusion of the Thirty Years War (1648), and does so with neither confessional bias nor the typical modern cynicism. Catholics, Protestants and secularists would do well to devour and learn from this work.Hopefully I’ll get around to a better review, but in any case this will stay on my shelf for a long time as a useful refres [...]

    17. James on said:

      When deciding on the rating to give to the books I've read, I'm always torn between giving it a score reflecting how I enjoyed the book subjectively and a score reflecting how good I recognised the book to be objectively. Frequently I'll find these two perspectives agree (it's certainly easier to enjoy a book that you recognise to be a literary achievement than to enjoy one you don't), but that really wasn't the case here.Let the record show that I didn't enjoy this book. It is long, dense and c [...]

    18. Edward C. on said:

      I'm effectively done at page 515. The text covers culture and morality (marriage, sex, etc.) that I may read later, but a brief skim suggests mainly author's bias from this point forward. And I've read the developmental history that I needed from it. Overall, I'd say the book is a well-written, although some times dry, history of the Reformation. As a Catholic reading this text, I have to say that the author was generally fair, treating both sides equally for the most part. I think he may have f [...]

    19. Rindis on said:

      MacCulloch’s book on the Protestant Reformation is a huge work on a huge subject. Everything you might expect is in here, and much, much, more.He starts with a fairly good overview of western Christianity at the end of the Middle Ages, and moves on to the expected history of the reformation. This covers the Reformation in terms of both thought and politics, and I’m not entirely sure that I really understand much more than I did before. Some of it is just me (I find philosophical/theological [...]

    20. Alexis on said:

      A wonderful and complete overview of the Reformation and a good section of 14th-17th century church history. It was pretty long as an audiobook (considering that the paper copy is only about 800 pages), but worthwhile listening once I got used to the slower narration style. The book is a useful starting place for understanding the Reformation and inspired me to keep reading church history and medieval-renaissance writings.

    21. Victoria Gaile on said:

      I've only read about a quarter of this (about up to the Council of Trent), but it is a fabulous book that I recommend at every possible opportunity. The author is Anglican, which gives him a reasonable claim to be in the /via media/ between Catholic and Protestant, and what I most appreciated about his perspective is that he gives the benefit of the doubt to all participants. He assumes that both sides were by and large acting in good faith -- an assumption which neither side made about the othe [...]

    22. Yael on said:

      Absolutely *brilliant* book. Meticulous research. Captivatingly well-written. And I learned so much. I love historical nonfiction, and tend to be very picky about which people I trust to give me not just a solid sense of time & place, but also a deeper understanding of the facts. This book would be of interest to any reader wanting to delve into historical European theology, politics, culture, etc.

    23. Leandro Guimarães on said:

      A quite Anglican — in the sense of Latitudinarism, not of militancy — history of Reformation & Counterreformation. While latitudinarian, it is still quite respectful of the Reformers’ convictions, even if its humanist, skeptical pressupositions are still apparent.

    24. Mark on said:

      Found this edition in a 2nd hand store for a few euros, looking forward to reading it.

    25. Calvin on said:

      A big book covering a huge area of Reformation history. Informative and balanced on the whole, though occasionally MacCulloch bleeds his own modern humanistic scholarship over the page.

    26. Martin on said:

      Excellent information, and probably as readable as can be expected.

    27. Paul Friebus on said:

      Interesting and educational, but wow36 hours of audiobook may have been too much, for this one. Unfortunately, the reader's voice was-for me-pretty grating and not very engaging. I did appreciate the author's former-Christian perspective, having grown up Christian and then left the church. It tended to give a much less obviously biased view of the many flavors of Christianity that rose during the 16-18th C. Having been raised in a very conservative Lutheran church, my exposure to the early histo [...]

    28. Lorenz on said:

      After finally finishing this book, I was really tempted to give this only a 1 star or 2star. This is because this book is clogged with too much information and written in such a dry manner as to make it very difficult to read. However, i did learn something from this book and although i was only interested in the political, military and diplomatic history of the reformation, this book gave me so much more. It would painstakingly explain to the reader everything about the history of the reformati [...]

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