Blind Rage: Letters to Helen Keller

Georgina Kleege

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Blind Rage: Letters to Helen Keller

Blind Rage Letters to Helen Keller As a young blind girl Georgina Kleege repeatedly heard the refrain Why can t you be like Helen Keller Kleege s resentment culminates in her book Blind Rage Letters to Helen Keller an ingenious exam

  • Title: Blind Rage: Letters to Helen Keller
  • Author: Georgina Kleege
  • ISBN: 9781563682957
  • Page: 400
  • Format: Paperback
  • As a young blind girl, Georgina Kleege repeatedly heard the refrain, Why can t you be like Helen Keller Kleege s resentment culminates in her book Blind Rage Letters to Helen Keller, an ingenious examination of the life of this renowned international figure using 21st century sensibilities Kleege s absorption with Keller originated as an angry response to the ideAs a young blind girl, Georgina Kleege repeatedly heard the refrain, Why can t you be like Helen Keller Kleege s resentment culminates in her book Blind Rage Letters to Helen Keller, an ingenious examination of the life of this renowned international figure using 21st century sensibilities Kleege s absorption with Keller originated as an angry response to the ideal of a secular saint, which no real blind or deaf person could ever emulate However, her investigation into the genuine person revealed that a much complex set of characters and circumstances shaped Keller s life.Blind Rage employs an adroit form of creative nonfiction to review the critical junctures in Keller s life The simple facts about Helen Keller are well known how Anne Sullivan taught her deaf blind pupil to communicate and learn her impressive career as a Radcliffe graduate and author her countless public appearances in various venues, from cinema to vaudeville, to campaigns for the American Foundation for the Blind But Kleege delves below the surface to question the perfection of this image Through the device of her letters, she challenges Keller to reveal her actual emotions, the real nature of her long relationship with Sullivan, with Sullivan s husband, and her brief engagement to Peter Fagan Kleege s imaginative dramatization, distinguished by her depiction of Keller s command of abstract sensations, gradually shifts in perspective from anger to admiration Blind Rage criticizes the Helen Keller myth for prolonging an unrealistic model for blind people, yet it appreciates the individual who found a practical way to live despite the restrictions of her myth.

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      Posted by:Georgina Kleege
      Published :2018-04-02T13:13:01+00:00

    One thought on “Blind Rage: Letters to Helen Keller

    1. Kathleen Hagen on said:

      Blind Rage: an open Letter to Helen Keller, by Georgina Kleege. Borrowed from Library of Congress Library Services for the blind.This month has definitely been one for amazing books, and this is another one. Georgina Kleege is a blind professor of English and creative writing at Berkeley. She took on the task of writing about Helen Keller, but with a difference. She tried to look beyond the myths about Helen, to analyze things that must have been stressful to Helen. She used all the nonfiction a [...]

    2. manatee on said:

      Helen Keller was a radical and possibly a lesbian.This was a wonderfully written, rich, scathing, funny, sympathetic book that introduced me to the idea of Disability Studies.I really learned to understand the different facets of the author's blindness. Also a refreshing, irreverent look at HK. A fantastic book.

    3. Evalangui on said:

      Daring format, interesting topic and thoughtful reflections. If you are looking for a biography, then no, this isn't it. This is Kleege's reading of all those other Hellen Keller books, her response to them, the ways in which she fills the gaps left by provable history and facts and comments on Keller's disability from the perspective of her own modern blind experience.Kleege is really interested in Keller's romantic life, I'm not convinced it is entirely because officially Keller is so asexuali [...]

    4. Erika on said:

      This is now one of my favorite books. I got it from the library out of curiosity. I've heard the criticisms that Keller was nothing without Anne Sullivan. She was simply trained to parrot some phrases, and cued by fingerspelling to act out specific behaviors. Sure, some of her accomplishments were remarkable, especially in the time and place where she lived. I suppose I can understand how some people might believe all that.What I hadn't realized was the level of resentment of Keller that's prese [...]

    5. Lightreads on said:

      A book I should have liked, but really, unreasonably didn't. A blind English professor writes letters to Helen Keller, who is a really uncomfortable figure for the disability community because her "story inscribes the idea that disability is a personal tragedy to be overcome through an individual's fortitude and pluck, rather than a set of cultural practices and assumptions effecting many individuals that could be changed through collective action." Kleege talks about that discomfort, and the as [...]

    6. Bart on said:

      "But now, I find myself spending endless hours speculating about the truth behind the facts of your life, wondering what really happened. I extrapolate, I read between the lines, I out-and-out fictionalize" (93). Georgina Kleege's Blind Rage is a creative historical non-fiction biography with analysis on real/imagined events, a (day)dream journal, and other musings to and about Helen Keller. Some of the analysis - such as observations on biographers' needs to preserve Keller as virginal and soci [...]

    7. Jennifer Anderson on said:

      I thought it was a great, thought-provoking book. A bit slow at times (for me, anyway), but overall I loved the read! It made me realize to what extent I myself had been forced to pass as a fully sighted person throughout my childhood. Not being allowed to hold my hand out in front of me so I wouldn't bump into things, being told to watch where I was going (a little hard for a legally blind person), and then not being taught to use a cane all made it seem like it was "better to look sighted". As [...]

    8. Pam on said:

      It took a little while to get used to the idea that someone would needle Helen Keller - which is the point - she's such an icon and "national treasure" that she was never allowed to be human - at least in the public eye. Georgina Kleege has done a good job of illustrating what irked her about the fairy tale of Helen Keller and Annie Sullivan.I hope to read some of the sources Kleege cites as my curiosity has been piqued about the situations Keller dealt with.

    9. Mia on said:

      A book that uses the conceit of correspondences between the author and HK to examine the latter's mythos and the problems it presents for the former as a contemporary blind woman. I want lots more people to read this.

    10. Michele on said:

      The first half was better than the second half. An OK book, not fabulous.

    11. Emily Michael on said:

      There aren't enough stars!!!!! This book is warm, engaging, and powerful. Kleege's treatment of Keller is personal but not saccharine. I loved this reading so much!

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