The Sword of Agrippa

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The Sword of Agrippa

The Sword of Agrippa THE SWORD OF AGRIPPA Antioch A rogue scientist s search for dark energy collides with forces intent on preserving the old ways Powerful oligarchs control science and religion Roy Swenson banned from

  • Title: The Sword of Agrippa
  • Author: GregoryNess
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 357
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • THE SWORD OF AGRIPPA Antioch A rogue scientist s search for dark energy collides with forces intent on preserving the old ways Powerful oligarchs control science and religion Roy Swenson, banned from the US, hits Prague on a quest for energy which will transform the world and lead to a new tech revolution, a new renaissance He is forced to continue his research inTHE SWORD OF AGRIPPA Antioch A rogue scientist s search for dark energy collides with forces intent on preserving the old ways Powerful oligarchs control science and religion Roy Swenson, banned from the US, hits Prague on a quest for energy which will transform the world and lead to a new tech revolution, a new renaissance He is forced to continue his research in Eastern Europe From Prague he sets the stage for the next battle One he hopes to win His experiments with DMT, pineal glands and the properties of a strange new substance graphene propel him into the spotlight, and the pressures build The war begins Mainstream industrial, political and religious leaders view him as a threat, not a joke Dark energy could disrupt humanity s view of everything Roy s dreams take him to Egypt as a young Roman soldier, Marcus Agrippa He falls for Samia, an Egyptian slave priestess In the secret chambers of the Great Library, she guides him through mysteries political and cosmic Dreams power Roy Agrippa through devastating events and sacrifices Join his quest Travel from Prague in 2020 to the Great Library of Alexandria in 48 BC, on a journey linking ancient scrolls, dark energy sensors, majestic temples, and torch lit torture chambers ______ 60,000 words.

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      Published :2018-04-15T13:38:00+00:00

    One thought on “The Sword of Agrippa

    1. The Just-About-Average Ms M on said:

      I am wondering how approximately 59 or 60 pages of downloaded Kindle text qualifies as anything approaching a book? I'm also wondering how readers gullible enough to download this "sampler" were able to leave such glowing reviews as if they had just polished off a 300-page tome?The writing is amateurish at best, and generally unpalatable at worst. There is no concept of point of view whatsoever--it changes from sentence to sentence. The descriptions are both heavy-handed, trite, and unintentiona [...]

    2. Lyn on said:

      This book is a ninja throat punch of tech savvy, psychological thriller. And it’s a cool historic fiction with some mysterious theological elements thrown in.It’s actually really good.Some critics will snark on the staccato deadpan delivery of author Gregory Lloyd’s style (were you the middle linebacker for the Steelers a few years ago?) but this experimental style is contextually correct for his narrative. This is post-modern and bold, a pop media stylized new writing that combines elemen [...]

    3. Réal Laplaine on said:

      Antioch, by Gregory Ness is a masterful piece of writing. I had the opportunity to read an earlier version of this book published in 2014. I considered it a good book at that reading, but now, having just read the 2016 edition, I rate this book as excellent! Without spoiling this beautifully done story, it takes us back and forth between the present, which is some years ahead of contemporary times, and thousands of years into the past, and then rolls us back and forth in an ever-consuming tale b [...]

    4. Harry Fox on said:

      Antioch (The Sword of Agrippa Book 1) by Gregory Ness – What a book! I am almost at a loss trying to describe it. This is great writing, with real depth. Historical allusions, crisp dialogue, plausible future science and a tale that spans the ages. Great stuff.It is a bit dystopian, with a future that shows a popular revolt against hard science, and researchers that are forced to retreat to Prague to continue their research. The main protagonist, Roy Swenson is a technologist that is trying to [...]

    5. Ellie Midwood on said:

      I have read and loved “Alexandria” – the second book in the series – and I just had to know how everything started, so of course I picked up “Antioch.” Unsurprisingly, it turned out to be a fabulous read! I loved the reincarnation/time travel/past-life-dreams concept, which created a story within a story: one in the near future and another one in the times of the Roman Empire under Caesar’s rule. Shown through the eyes of the protagonist, a scientist in exile Roy, it seamlessly wea [...]

    6. Tony Sunderland on said:

      Gregory Ness in his book Antioch (The Sword of Agrippa Book 1) takes the reader an existential adventure that spans over 2000 years of real history and into an imagined future. His impressive ability to recreate the tumultuous period of Western civilisation that gave us Julius Caesar, Cleopatra and Augustus is juxtaposed against a bleak dystopian future ruled by an elite and ruthless Technocracy. However, beneath the historical story and the imagined future Mr Ness describes a deeper quest for s [...]

    7. Pete Carter on said:

      The confluence of two lifelines :The principal story follows the struggles of a much persecuted scientist, Roy Swenson, in his search to unleash the power of dark energy. Effectively exiled from the U.S. he forms a team of like-minded scientists in Prague who together start to produce results. But Roy is a troubled man, he dreams and his dreams are vivid and memorable. At first, he believes them to be nothing more than dreams, until he is approached by a stranger who appears to know much more ab [...]

    8. March Shoggoth Madness The Haunted Reading Room on said:

      Review: ANTIOCH by Gregory NessANTIOCH is a creatively imagined novel which interweaves near-future prediction with ancient history and metaphysics and technological advancement. In a very ugly near future not far enough from today, narrow-minded oligarchy rules. In cooperation with fundamentalist religion, science has been either shut down or driven underground. Many scientists have been killed outright or have died in mysterious freak events. What science and technology remain are dumbed down, [...]

    9. Faith Jones on said:

      This week I’ve read Antioch Part 1 by Gregory Ness and have also been lucky enough to read the first ninety or so pages of Part 2, The Sword of Agrippa, as an ARC taster of the next installment in the series. My main discussion will be about the first book because it’s not fair to give a review or a score to just a section of a second novel, where the missing majority might be of a different standard. Part 2 Section 1 was intriguing but, you know what I mean, I’ve got to be consistent.Look [...]

    10. Jeffery J. on said:

      Antioch is a smorgasbord of technical and mystical delights. Not only does the author’s imagination entertain readers but so does his grasp of history — e.g the birth of the alliance of Caesar and Cleopatra. And even more than the science that we learn, there is the lost knowledge of the ancient world — pre-Egyptian! — that we hope to discover. Indeed, seeking knowledge (like seeking the Holy Grail in a different era) is a central theme for the characters in both Egypt and Czechia.In the [...]

    11. J.C. Steel on said:

      Antioch follows the story of Roy Swenson, a scientist in an age where science has become reviled by extremists and scientists are hunted and killed on the streets; and in another incarnation, the story of the young Marcus Agrippa, following his Caesar to Alexandria to start a series of events that will echo through history. Other events in that time, less public, still shadow Roy’s life two thousand years later, as he struggles to find support and funding for a ground-breaking research project [...]

    12. Nathan Mercer on said:

      As humans, we like to think that we are in control of things and that our knowledge puts us at the top of the evolutionary pyramid. But how much do we really know? If you consider just our senses - there are many examples showing that we are inferior to most other creatures. That leaves us with the ability to reason as one of the things that sets us apart. And because of this, the science industry is trying desperately to sell the idea that we now know everything there is to know.Anything that c [...]

    13. C.L. on said:

      This is the first novel in a series and it is about ideas, always hard to translate into a good yarn. I enjoyed the basic story line, subscribe to many of the concepts the author champions, and found the characters memorable, especially Samia. I would have given it at least another star except the prose needs polish, preferably by a professional editor. There are basic grammar and diction errors that distract the reader and detract from the novel's effect. The action jumps back and forth in a wa [...]

    14. JoselynMoreno Burke on said:

      It was an interesting book, a little too technical for me, I can recommend it for people that likes very structured writing. The writing is very specific and realistic and the future it portray is an interesting one where science seems to have reach its peak and some people want or are aware that everything around them is evolving even more. for me as I said it was a little too heavy but it was very interesting the way the narrative tells you how everything have changed in a period of time and w [...]

    15. Gillian H on said:

      "The Sword of Agrippa” is definitely one of the more “different” books I’ve read in a very long time. It was such an interesting mix of almost everything, and it is really hard to just sum up or categorize easily. That said, I did enjoy it very much once I was all the way done, but there were several parts where I wondered what was going on and did feel confused by things. I liked the characters, but couldn’t quite figure them out, which is perhaps the author’s intention. There were [...]

    16. E.M. Swift-Hook on said:

      A ‘God of the Gaps’ Science Fantasy.“When you read, you tint the words with your own experiences. There is no such thing as an objective historian.”Roy Swenson is a researcher who lives in a not-so-distant future where science and religion have somehow divided society into two exclusive and intractable world views. A fatal accident during one of his experiments and a desire to work in borderline areas of science, cost Roy his job and he relocates to Prague where there is still some acade [...]

    17. Damon on said:

      Interesting take on Sci-fi/ Ancient Roman empire story. Chapters are alternating in the past/ in the future. The main character is Agrippa, the famous engineer who modernized Rome during Augustus's rule. IN this story he visits Alexandria in Egypt and becomes fascinated by a cult that he stumbles into, They include him in a search for Ancient mysteries, after having lost the great Library to the fire during a port battle.

    18. Hock Tjoa on said:

      This novel covers a lot of ground.It is set in contemporary Silicon Valley and Prague as well as Alexandria and Antioch about the time of Julius Caesar.The characters change as well with the assumption of reincarnation - between the present day scientist and the Roman general, for instance. "While they bore no physical resemblance, a sense of commonality existed Mannerisms, perhaps. The energy in their eyes, facial expressions. Behavioral quirks." And there is Jude the Tzaddik, a mysterious obs [...]

    19. D.C. Wolf on said:

      Entangling two books into one; that is how I resolved the parallel plots in Antioch (The Sword of Agrippa Book 1) by Gregory Lloyd. (The author describes the plot well in the description of the book, therefore I did not replay them in this review. The book is also listed under Religion & Spirituality, Occult & Paranormal , Hermetism & Rosicrucianism, and Alchemy versus Science Fiction, yet there were elements of science fiction and future technologies throughout, including a connecti [...]

    20. Joy on said:

      It’s 2020 and Roy Swenson is a scientist pushing the limits with his theories but with America under the stronghold of strict laws regarding science and religion he finds himself exiled by the science community, the religious establishment and even organized atheists. He goes off to Prague a place where science is less regulated by laws and he calls upon others like him willing to push the boundaries. Using science, engineering, drugs and a bit of mysticism they’ll work toward finding a way [...]

    21. Andrew on said:

      One of the more enjoyable books that I have read over the past few years and the first that I have felt compelled to review. Not typically a science fiction fan but found myself gripped not only with the two main characters' - Roy & Agrippa - individual arcs, but if/how they ultimately intertwine (you get a sense early on that there is a connection and thinking through that relationship was probably my favorite part of the novel).Finished the entire thing on a cross-country flight and immedi [...]

    22. Rebecca Foster on said:

      I was a bit nervous about this one, having never reviewed a sampler before. I wasn't sure how I'd feel about reading such a small portion of an ebook. What if I truly like it? Can I recommend something I haven't read through to the end?Those questions and more swirled about within my brain, threatening to suffocate me with my own anxieties. But then I realized somethingIf you don't try something different, you'll always wonder what could have happened if you did.And you know what?I'm glad I did. [...]

    23. Scot on said:

      An excellent first novel from Gregory Lloyd that reads like a Dan Brown novel in terms of pacing but draws more deeply on history, quantum physics, and the esoteric influences that seem to have shaped the worldview of the author than the level you usually find from Brown. Part one of a series that explores the race to tap into the potential of dark matter by a group of "fringe" scientists that have been exiled from the overly complacent and corrupt scientific and religious community in the US. T [...]

    24. Andrew on said:

      I am a sucker for historical fiction. And taking me to the setting of Ancient Egypt, Antioch had me at hello. From the jacket liner, you knew that the story would travel to Ancient Rome and Egypt, but getting there was all the fun.It begins in modern times. The main character is a modern day, silicon valley executive who is embroiled in a technology war. And as the epic unfolds, we are whisked away on a modern day thrill race to discover a new groundbreaking technology. And through this technolo [...]

    25. Laura on said:

      Fast-paced, well written and thought provoking, “The Sword of Agrippa: Antioch” by Gregory Lloyd is a must read for anyone who is looking to read something that is totally different from the norm. There is something of everything in this novel, from action, romance, history, religion, science, mystery, magic… and it just ‘feels’ big and epic, with a varied cast of colorful characters. I wasn’t totally a fan of the time jumps as I got confused at some parts and there were some minor e [...]

    26. Samantha on said:

      "The Sword of Agrippa” was the first book I’ve read by Gregory Lloyd, but I assure you it will not be the last! From the opening pages I was drawn into this exciting tale, and I admit I loved how the author blended so many various aspects of religion, science… even using real characters& figures from history, into one awesome book. I almost felt like I just read five novels instead of one, so much happens! I was thoroughly engaged from the opening pages and my interest never faded unti [...]

    27. Jenna on said:

      Wow, what an incredible ride! At first I wasn’t sure what to really make of this story as it seemed to jump around a bit and cover so much ground. But I quickly found myself sinking into this mystical and brilliant world that the author Gregory Lloyd created, and found myself transported to another time and place altogether. For me a mark of a good book is if it can 1) take me away from the ‘real world’ for a while 2) entertain me or educate me and make me think of things in a different wa [...]

    28. Corey on said:

      Its over?!? Too short! I kept thinking as the number of pages was getting nearer the end "how can it be over soon, its just starting!" (Just a note: I received this from the author for a review)I liked this a lot! Its not quite what I was expecting, but it was wonderful. I did feel frustrated at times because its not always made clear who is talking when dialog shows up, that's really my only complaint though. The dialog itself was weird sometimes, but I think it was done on purpose, stylistical [...]

    29. Karen *ReaderGirl* on said:

      Lately I’ve been in a rut of putting down books and not picking them up again because I lost interest at one point and just never continued. This was definitely not the case with this book, “The Sword of Agrippa” by Gregory Lloyd! From the very beginning the action flowed seamlessly from one page to the next, and was unpredictable enough to keep me hooked. Not formulaic or cookie-cutter at all, and I was genuinely shocked by a few unexpected twists. Liked the fast pace of the dialogue and [...]

    30. Vicki Smith on said:

      Past and future collide, the author is very good expertise provoking piece of fiction. Roy’s dreams take him through secret rooms in the Great Library of Alexandria as a young Roman soldier, Marcus Agrippa. Agrippa falls in love with an Egyptian slave priestess. In the secret chambers of the Great Library she guides him through racks of now lost scrolls. Agrippa will grow up to become a pillar of the newly formed Empire, thanks to the knowledge acquired in the Library. this book is mind blowin [...]

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