Faction Paradox: Burning with Optimism's Flames

Jay Eales Elizabeth Evershed Simon Bucher-Jones Jonathan Dennis Aditya Bidikar Sarah Hadley Philip Purser-Hallard Paul Mccaffrey

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Faction Paradox: Burning with Optimism's Flames

Faction Paradox Burning with Optimism s Flames I can remember asking him What are the stars Where do they come from He would tell me that the stars are burning worlds caught forever in their unending flames raging roaring against the night The

  • Title: Faction Paradox: Burning with Optimism's Flames
  • Author: Jay Eales Elizabeth Evershed Simon Bucher-Jones Jonathan Dennis Aditya Bidikar Sarah Hadley Philip Purser-Hallard Paul Mccaffrey
  • ISBN: 9781909031050
  • Page: 177
  • Format: Hardcover
  • I can remember asking him, What are the stars Where do they come from He would tell me that the stars are burning worlds, caught forever in their unending flames, raging, roaring against the night They look out beyond their fragile spheres for places of calm and serenity to shine their brightness and bring life.He would clasp me around the shoulder and say that we wereI can remember asking him, What are the stars Where do they come from He would tell me that the stars are burning worlds, caught forever in their unending flames, raging, roaring against the night They look out beyond their fragile spheres for places of calm and serenity to shine their brightness and bring life.He would clasp me around the shoulder and say that we were like stars We had to use the energy within us to defeat the cold spaces, to turn away the dark things that dared to destroy life We had to find our own calmness and serenity even when it was denied us.I don t think I understood him then I was too small, and my brother never spoke in the concrete terms that my brain could comprehend.Looking back on it, though, I think that s when P.J began to burn Intermediant Izzy Ring, The Heaven Facility

    • ✓ Faction Paradox: Burning with Optimism's Flames || ✓ PDF Read by î Jay Eales Elizabeth Evershed Simon Bucher-Jones Jonathan Dennis Aditya Bidikar Sarah Hadley Philip Purser-Hallard Paul Mccaffrey
      177 Jay Eales Elizabeth Evershed Simon Bucher-Jones Jonathan Dennis Aditya Bidikar Sarah Hadley Philip Purser-Hallard Paul Mccaffrey
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ Faction Paradox: Burning with Optimism's Flames || ✓ PDF Read by î Jay Eales Elizabeth Evershed Simon Bucher-Jones Jonathan Dennis Aditya Bidikar Sarah Hadley Philip Purser-Hallard Paul Mccaffrey
      Posted by:Jay Eales Elizabeth Evershed Simon Bucher-Jones Jonathan Dennis Aditya Bidikar Sarah Hadley Philip Purser-Hallard Paul Mccaffrey
      Published :2018-06-06T20:25:45+00:00

    One thought on “Faction Paradox: Burning with Optimism's Flames

    1. Andrew Hickey on said:

      (Ob. disclaimer -- I know several of the authors in this collection, as well as the publisher, in a friendly-on-Twitter-and-Facebook kind of way. However, I got to know these people, in most part, because of my admiration for their work, and so I don't believe that me knowing them is biasing me towards liking their work more. But it's better to say these things upfront.)That this is a book geared to my tastes should be obvious from the very title. I love the Faction Paradox books anyway, but thi [...]

    2. Leo H on said:

      Gosh has it really taken me over a month to finish this one? Blimey. Anyway, a bit of a book of two halves really, this is another Faction Paradox short story collection from the fab folks at Obverse Books, and while roughly half of them are excellent, the other half are quite, quite poor. They are broadly arranged thusly; bad ones at the beginning, good ones at the end, which in fairness is probably the best way round to do it, but the first few really did feel like a slog. Let's do a one sente [...]

    3. Richard Wright on said:

      The second volume of Faction Paradox tales from Obverse Books, and another glorious Pandora's Box of storytelling. It remains the case that the Faction is such a flexible concept that the stories in these books can (and do) take you absolutely anywhere. That's part of the joy of these. You never know what you're going to get next. Even more than in the previous collection 'A Romance in Twelve Parts', 'Optimism's Flames' allows the Faction to remain a shadowy influence on other people stories. If [...]

    4. Peter on said:

      It's an eclectic mix of stories. Just going to show that any kind of genre can be given a Faction taint. As a whole it reminds me of the blind men and the elephant parable, where the blind man feels the tail and assumes it's a rope: These short stories offer you facets of the Faction, from which you can build your own rope, pillar, wall or pipe of Faction Paradox.I have to say though, that some of the stories very much seem to be non-Faction that the author appears to have tacked on some referen [...]

    5. N on said:

      A Faction Paradox collection without any kind of overarching narrative or theme, really giving the authors the chance to go all out. Raleigh Dreaming by Elizabeth Evershed is a gorgeous historical story that really sets the tone. A beautiful, artsy, frightening dream told through the eyes of Sir Walter Raleigh, spanning several countries as well as centuries. Office Politics by Alan Taylor is sweet, gruesome, well-written and to the point. Very Junji Ito, in a way. The twist in the narration sty [...]

    6. Alex Sarll on said:

      If you didn't have the first idea what Faction Paradox was, you could still enjoy a fair chunk of Burning With Optimism's Flames just as an anthology of weird fiction. Juliet Kemp's 'Squatters' Rights', for instance: a creepy little contemporary horror story about that old, bad idea of editing one's unpleasant memories. Or 'Office Politics' by Alan Taylor, which could be summarised as David Cronenberg doing deservedly horrible things to Ricky Gervais. Other tales leave Stevenage far behind, taki [...]

    7. Dan on said:

      Well this one is both equally good, and equally bad. The good is extremely good (the stories by Elizabeth Evershed, Alan Taylor, Sarah Hadley, and Phil PH, for example), but the bad is quite bad (I'm including dreadfully boring in this class). I was certainly expecting more, considering how great Tales of the City was. Disappointing.

    8. Rachel Redhead on said:

      another erudite accomplishment of fantabulous astoundment to amuse the grandest of viziers and entertain the common folk after a spot of supper and a goblet of fine neverberry wine

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