Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture

Henry Jenkins Sam Ford Joshua Green

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Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture

Spreadable Media Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture Spreadable Media maps fundamental changes taking place in our contemporary media environment a space where corporations no longer tightly control media distribution and many of us are directly involv

  • Title: Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture
  • Author: Henry Jenkins Sam Ford Joshua Green
  • ISBN: 9780814743508
  • Page: 171
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Spreadable Media maps fundamental changes taking place in our contemporary media environment, a space where corporations no longer tightly control media distribution and many of us are directly involved in the circulation of content It contrasts stickiness aggregating attention in centralized places with spreadability dispersing content widely through both formal andSpreadable Media maps fundamental changes taking place in our contemporary media environment, a space where corporations no longer tightly control media distribution and many of us are directly involved in the circulation of content It contrasts stickiness aggregating attention in centralized places with spreadability dispersing content widely through both formal and informal networks, some approved, many unauthorized Stickiness has been the measure of success in the broadcast era and has been carried over to the online world , but spreadability describes the ways content travels through social media Following up on the hugely influential Convergence Culture Where Old and New Media Collide, this book challenges some of the prevailing metaphors and frameworks used to describe contemporary media, from biological metaphors like memes and viral to the concept of Web 2.0 and the popular notion of influencers Spreadable Media examines the nature of audience engagement, the environment of participation, the way appraisal creates value, and the transnational flows at the heart of these phenomena It delineates the elements that make content spreadable and highlights emerging media business models built for a world of participatory circulation The book also explores the internal tensions companies face as they adapt to the new communication reality and argues for the need to shift from hearing to listening in corporate culture Drawing on examples from film, music, games, comics, television, transmedia storytelling, advertising, and public relations industries, among others from both the U.S and around the world the authors illustrate the contours of our current media environment They highlight the vexing questions content creators must tackle and the responsibilities we all face as citizens in a world where many of us regularly circulate media content Written for any and all of us who actively create and share media content, Spreadable Media provides a clear understanding of how people are spreading ideas and the implications these activities have for business, politics, and everyday life.

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      171 Henry Jenkins Sam Ford Joshua Green
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      Published :2018-04-12T13:20:10+00:00

    One thought on “Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture

    1. Renata on said:

      Too many pages for too little ideas It is an interesting book despite the fact that it deals with the big questions only superficially. It keeps repeating itself But the first 2 chapters are good.

    2. Darren on said:

      Much has been written and is being written about how the media operates today, with audiences relationship with media texts far more complex than ever before. The internet and digital media affords audiences not only new opportunities and platforms for consumption of the media, but also creation too. Following on from Jenkins 2008 book Convergence Culture, this really is the most up to date analysis of the media you can get today. Spreadable Media focuses on the distribution, re-distribution and [...]

    3. Katrina Sark on said:

      Introduction: Why Media Spreadsp.17 – The term “viral” first appeared in science fiction stories, describing (generally bad) ideas that spread like germs. p.18 – The notion of the media as virus taps a larger discussion that compares systems of cultural distribution to biological systems. 1 – Where Web 2.0 Went Wrongp.48 – The idea of Web 2.0 was introduced at a 2004 conference of the O’Reilly Media Group. In Tim O’Reilly’s formulation, Web 2.0 companies rely on the Internet as [...]

    4. Jacqueline on said:

      Finally finished this. It wasn't entirely what I was expecting, but I enjoyed it. I anticipated the focus to be more on online media industries, but it paid a lot of attention to how the internet is changing traditional media industries. As such, I think it'd be a really useful book for anyone teaching media industries courses. It's useful for my New Media Theory grad course, and select chapters are very useful for my social media strategies course. I think the book takes a balanced approach to [...]

    5. Atila Iamarino on said:

      Vim esperando um livro com uma análise rasa, por quem não está inserido na mídia, como costumam ser as revisões acadêmicas, mas fui muito bem surpreendido. Excelente livro, que explica desde o que leva as pessoas a compartilhar ou produzir conteúdo ao que faz ele se espalhar. Recomendadíssimo para qualquer um que queira entender a cultura atual.

    6. Peggy Otto on said:

      Anyone teaching composition should read this book. Jenkins challenges us to think about composition in all its forms, especially how we can mix text, image, sound, and performance to create rich designs with complex meanings.

    7. Rachel Brill on said:

      Super great read. I've never had an introductions to theories and examples such as those provided by these authors, so the book kept my interest. However, I did feel as though the ideas started to repeat themselves toward the end.

    8. David H Deans on said:

      I read this book through the lens of a content marketing practitioner that was curious what new insight Henry Jenkins and his co-authors would add to the information and guidance that's already available on this topic -- both online and in other books.The authors believe that "if it doesn't spread, it's dead." To me, that's an oversimplified explanation of today's environment. Also, most of their case studies are from the American entertainment industry. In contrast, I'm more interested in how t [...]

    9. Brad on said:

      When I worked at MIT’s Technology Review in 2006, I had the pleasure of editing a few pieces from Henry Jenkins that would become part of Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide, his seminal work exploring transmedia storytelling and its impact on the television, film, and publishing industries. In Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture, Jenkins and his co-authors expand on that work, examining the ways stories, content, and other created materials are [...]

    10. Chelsea Aldrich on said:

      Crucial for people who are interested in how media flows from person to person, group to group, trans-culturally and trans-nationally. The writers provide case studies on all types of groups - Christian evangelists, Brazilian ravers, ghost hunters, WWE fans, telenova audiences, etc. - to set up the argument that we are shifting from a broadcast paradigm to a spreadability paradigm, where participatory culture rules and people use, remix and recontextualize media to create or add to discussions t [...]

    11. Jenny Thompson on said:

      I thought Spreadable Media was quite good. It brought up a lot of points of the various ways that media is evolving. One of the most intriguing parts to me was a discussion of how online piracy creates a wider audience for a work and whether that advantage compensates for the lack of monetary compensation. The idea of an enhanced book intrigues me, and I look forward to reading the some of the essays posted on the website.The only downside of this book was stylistic. It suffered from the seeming [...]

    12. Zack on said:

      The authors do a good job of compiling a number of interesting case studies in the evolving media environment surrounding participation and the collision of fan cultures with the bigger media conglomerates. In their introduction some attention is paid to the fact that there are two sides to this story--one positive and one negative--and the intention of striking a balance between the two is expressed. Throughout the course of the book, though, it seems the authors err far too often on the more h [...]

    13. Rimantas on said:

      The book gives great new insights into ways the Internet is changing media creation and consumption. Its main idea – that the traditional broadcast media is giving way to new paradigms based on sharing and co-creation – is well grounded with examples and case studies. It also cleverly challenges some hype concepts like web 2.0 or viral. A bit frustrating is the criticism of profit-driven activities completely mixed up with appraisals of successful marketing campaigns (basically, actions of t [...]

    14. Ted Lehmann on said:

      I have completed reading Spreadable Media and will write a review in the next few days. It's an important and scholarly piece examining the ways in which ideas and their bearers are spread, re-thought, and reworked to suit various audiences and and constituencies. It also considers in great deal the affect of new media and their transmission on such issues as ownership and copyright. Written in scholarly language with many relevant examples from popular and social media, it is though provoking. [...]

    15. Taylor Ellwood on said:

      This book examines the concept of viral media and argues for a different paradigm based on participatory culture and fandom, where people choose to spread ideas and their interests to other people. It's a fascinating book that presents an alternative perspective on marketing, but also on pop culture studies, bringing those studies to the 21st century by focusing on the role of social media within pop culture. If you are interested in pop culture, you'll find this book useful for understanding ho [...]

    16. Rick on said:

      An excellent book. Readable, well argued and exemplified. It's basic premise is that the metaphor we use for new media should be how it is spreadable (like dandelions) as opposed to sticky, broadcast or viral. The book looks examines new media with this metaphor in mind, looking at business practices, and impacts on cultural and global issues. Examples are recent and engaging. A little long winded at times. But it's worth the effort! An important scholarly work in media studies in general and ne [...]

    17. Eliana on said:

      A must read for Media Studies. While there are plenty of social media books that look at the phenomenon of sharing, Jenkins looks more at the material itself that is or isn't being shared. The main focus of the book is on the broadcast, mass-media business model of "stickiness" of content vs. the parallel concept of "spreadability".There's an enhanced version with a lot of essays and useful information about the case studies.

    18. Naísia on said:

      Increasingly, everyone is making media as part of the normal response to reading/listening/viewing rather than out of desire to be media producers in training" (p.185)() each of us should think about our complicity in the material we pass along, about the responsability we hold as citizens to vet what we share, and about our reputations as curators for the information we choose to circulate". (p.304)

    19. Cassie Kabrick on said:

      I have never read a book with a longer introduction that this book. 47 pages. Who writes intros that long? We used it for a media class and this was a good book for the class. Slightly interesting, had some good info in it. But it was just like every other business book, dry. Some day someone should learn how to write an interesting business book.

    20. Solange Uhieda on said:

      The book contains several collaborators - researchers and market professionals and aims to clarify how people spread the ideas for messaging web and social networks. What implication that these activities have on our daily lives, the economic environment and even political decisions. Suitable for anyone who spreads and produces content in the internet and new media.

    21. Ninakix on said:

      I'm a fan of Jenkins, he gets fandom. Academic book, but some really interesting looks at how the internet is changing not just how people interact with media, but the *kinds* of media that they become interested in. Also, wrestling with the question of how you make money making content is hard right now.

    22. Vika Gardner on said:

      Good read. A little on the basic side, very much centered on US media, with a few forays into Africa (Nigeria) and South Asia (India). But as a basic work, it does an excellent job of summarizing and contextualizing a lot of research.

    23. Marc on said:

      Thoroughly enjoyed the book and interactions with one of the authors, Sam Ford, throughout. An ongoing interaction with the text from a library-centric viewpoint occurred on my blog, marclibrary.wordpress. Final instalment is yet to come as of the writing of this review.

    24. Nick on said:

      Jenkins, the patron saint of fan fiction, and his collaborators, deconstruct the way media works in a networked society.

    25. Frank Rose on said:

      If you want to know how media distribution works in the Internet age, you have to read this book.

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