Always Coca-Cola

Alexandra Chreiteh Michelle Hartman ألكسندرا شريتح

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Always Coca-Cola

Always Coca Cola The narrator of Always Coca Cola Abeer Ward fragrant rose in Arabic daughter of a conservative family admits wryly that her name is also the name of her fathers flower shop Abeers bedroom window

  • Title: Always Coca-Cola
  • Author: Alexandra Chreiteh Michelle Hartman ألكسندرا شريتح
  • ISBN: 9781566568432
  • Page: 330
  • Format: Paperback
  • The narrator of Always Coca Cola, Abeer Ward fragrant rose, in Arabic , daughter of a conservative family, admits wryly that her name is also the name of her fathers flower shop Abeers bedroom window is filled by a view of a Coca Cola sign featuring the image of her sexually adventurous friend, Jana From the novels opening paragraphWhen my mother was pregnant with me, The narrator of Always Coca Cola, Abeer Ward fragrant rose, in Arabic , daughter of a conservative family, admits wryly that her name is also the name of her fathers flower shop Abeers bedroom window is filled by a view of a Coca Cola sign featuring the image of her sexually adventurous friend, Jana From the novels opening paragraphWhen my mother was pregnant with me, she had only one craving That craving was for Coca Colafirst time novelist Alexandra Chreiteh asks us to see, with wonder, humor, and dismay, how inextricably confused naming and desire, identity and branding are The namesand the novels edgy, cynical humormight be recognizable across languages, but Chreitehs novel is first and foremost an exploration of a specific Lebanese milieu Critics in Lebanon have called the novel an electric shock.

    • Free Read [Science Book] ↠ Always Coca-Cola - by Alexandra Chreiteh Michelle Hartman ألكسندرا شريتح ✓
      330 Alexandra Chreiteh Michelle Hartman ألكسندرا شريتح
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Science Book] ↠ Always Coca-Cola - by Alexandra Chreiteh Michelle Hartman ألكسندرا شريتح ✓
      Posted by:Alexandra Chreiteh Michelle Hartman ألكسندرا شريتح
      Published :2018-06-27T04:45:16+00:00

    One thought on “Always Coca-Cola

    1. محمود النوري on said:

      أشعر بأني لا أستطيع مسامحة الكاتبة على إنهاء الرواية بذلك الشكل، بنية الرواية متماسكة والحوارات ومكان الأحداث - بيروت - كل شيء جيد حتى قررت الكاتبة التوقف بلا فرامل ودون سابق إنذار أو غلق أي باب قد قررت مسبقاً أن تفتحه في ذهن القاريء الذي أخذ من وقته ليعطيه لها.

    2. Iana on said:

      I really, really wanted to like this book. It looked so perfect as something to suggest to my Arabic students - short, funny (according to the reviews), youthful. The review below must be the worst I have published, ever.This is easily the most terribly written book I have read in the past decade. The author was frightfully young when she wrote it - I think barely 20, if that, and it really shows. Apart from obvious lack of depth in her observations and character shaping, she had clearly not don [...]

    3. Amy on said:

      On the one hand, the book has this wonderful honest voice and at first, an irresistible charm.But then there's the story, or lack thereof, and the ending that made me wonder if the author suddenly ran out of paper.I'd call the following a spoiler, but since the author treats the subject with such dismissal, then it's really not a spoiler. The narrator gets raped toward the end, and not once does she talk about the rape. Instead she frets about her hymen and figuring out how to buy a pregnancy te [...]

    4. Akeiisa on said:

      I think something got lost in translation. Marketed as "edgy" with "cynical humor," I found this to be a rather pedestrian read with some feminist overtones countered by traditional/conservative values parroted be the main character. The characters are flat and I didn't really care what happened to them, as the story didn't really go anywhere and there were no real consequences or outcomes.

    5. Kristin on said:

      I highly recommend reading the translator's afterward first and part of me is convinced that it is the mostly intellectually intriguing part of the book, especially the interplay between translator and writer, language and politics. In fact, if one is able to read it in the original Arabic, I highly recommend doing so. The translation, though a valiant attempt, does not quite do the story justice. Moreover, one should be well versed in Lebanese culture and politics, because otherwise the book is [...]

    6. Cristina Melchior on said:

      Fast reading novel.A short novel full of irony, Always Coca-Cola depicts contemporary problems shared by native and immigrant young women living in Beirut.

    7. Mohamed Diaa on said:

      Interesting Short Story about 3 girls in Lebanon, not quite clear about date of those events it is fun story with easy English language,it let you dive into young Arabic girl mind crossing all her thoughts about life, family,friendship ,Sex and a lot other

    8. Ilona on said:

      A short, easy read, set in Lebanon and written originally in Arabic. I read it because I was curious to read a book from this culture, and encouraged by a web site which suggested it amongst 10 'beginner Arabic' books. I chose it above other titles because it was funny.It wasn't funny. Now, I am quite willing to believe the problem is with me rather than the book. Maybe if were more familiar with Arabic writing and culture, I'd have seen the humour.There were some almost-funny bits, but the humo [...]

    9. Michael Estey on said:

      Written by Alexandra ChreitehTranslated from Arabic by Michelle HartmanInterlink Books Always Coca-ColaAbeer Ward, the narrator, a woman, says it like it is.In Lebanon.Scary.Rape, pregnancy, abortion, menstral flow.In a country where women a secondary.Definitely an eye opener.About Abeer, and her two friends.One a model, a narcasist. The other a boxer a lesbian?Both females.In search of a sanitary napkin.Basically a woman's book.Chreiteh's style, easy, quick reading.I would recommend it for a wo [...]

    10. Kath on said:

      Wow. I guess I could give this book higher marks for realistically portraying the superficiality of 20-somethings at LAU, but I'm hoping the author is just off the mark. I have to believe there is more brain-trust in Beirut. Abeer, the narrator of the story is shallow, self-absorbed and stupidly naive. If the book is satire, it works as such. But I'm not sure who the intended audience is. Compared to Fadi Zagmout's THE BRIDE OF AMMAN, there is nothing redeeming at the end of this short novel. Th [...]

    11. Ellen on said:

      Decent enough plot, but the details seemed to be missing for me. I read the whole thing in about 2 hours, so at least it was a quick read.Maybe some of the story was lost in the translation, but I honestly think the best part of this book was the cover art. I wouldn't say it was bad per se, but I also wouldn't recommend it

    12. Nuha on said:

      شريت الكتاب بعد ما جذبني عنوانه و غلافه بدون اي فكرة مسبقه عنهيمكن لو كنت عارفه انه الكتاب (عربي) كنت شريته بلغته الاصلية و ليس بترجمة انجليزيةالكتاب لغته كانت مملة و اتوقع السبب لانه مترجماستمريت في قرأته لاني لا استطيع ان ابدأ كتاب بدون ان انهيه ☺️

    13. Zenobia on said:

      The best word I can think of to describe this book is weird. I think much of that may have to do with the translation, but it seems the writing style is strange as well. So. many. exclamation points.

    14. Maimoona Rahman on said:

      Plotline: none, like a quickie. Maybe because it tries to be a realistic portrayal of life. There are times when the narrator seems too polemic, but a questionable narrator is a good one. The book is a quick read, so it's not a waste of time.

    15. Nada_saad on said:

      officially one of my favorite novels ever. Its so rare when you find a novel that makes you burst into laughter from the very first 4 pages.

    16. Liz on said:

      very easy read, finished in one day. interesting story but the ending moves pretty quickly. overall pretty good

    17. Bram on said:

      Fun short story that provides a nice insight into the life of young women in Lebanon.

    18. Sabrina on said:

      Interesting insight into the lives of young women in Beirut, however, I found the narration a bit basic.

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