Petticoats and Frock Coats: Revolution and Victorian-Age Fashions from the 1770s to the 1860s

Cynthia Overbeck Bix

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Petticoats and Frock Coats: Revolution and Victorian-Age Fashions from the 1770s to the 1860s

Petticoats and Frock Coats Revolution and Victorian Age Fashions from the s to the s What would you have worn if you lived during the American Revolution or the early s It depends on who you were Women wore layers and layers of undergarments including corsets chemises and petti

  • Title: Petticoats and Frock Coats: Revolution and Victorian-Age Fashions from the 1770s to the 1860s
  • Author: Cynthia Overbeck Bix
  • ISBN: 9780761358886
  • Page: 385
  • Format: Hardcover
  • What would you have worn if you lived during the American Revolution or the early 1800s It depends on who you were Women wore layers and layers of undergarments, including corsets, chemises, and petticoats Wealthy women followed fashion trends from Europe One daring dress was the Empire style gown, which featured a high waist, a low neckline, bare arms, and clinging faWhat would you have worn if you lived during the American Revolution or the early 1800s It depends on who you were Women wore layers and layers of undergarments, including corsets, chemises, and petticoats Wealthy women followed fashion trends from Europe One daring dress was the Empire style gown, which featured a high waist, a low neckline, bare arms, and clinging fabric Men of wealth wore powdered wigs in the Revolutionary era Men flaunted plenty of accessories, including neckties, top hats, walking sticks, and pocket watches Women accessorized with gloves, hats, parasols, and fans Most farmers made do with only one or two outfits Farm women spun yarn, wove fabric, and sewed clothing for the whole family At the start of the Revolutionary War, American soldiers wore their ordinary clothes into battle Uniforms showed up later On southern plantation, some house slaves dressed in stylish dapper uniforms But field slaves wore coarse, sacklike garments Very young boys and girls dressed alike in short sleeved cotton dresses After age four, boys switched to knee length pants Read about Revolutionary and early 1800s fashions from pantaloons to silk stockings to tricornered hats in this fascinating book

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      Posted by:Cynthia Overbeck Bix
      Published :2018-06-21T07:24:51+00:00

    One thought on “Petticoats and Frock Coats: Revolution and Victorian-Age Fashions from the 1770s to the 1860s

    1. Carmen on said:

      I love reading about fashion and clothing from the past. This book covers 1770-1860 clothing from the American Revolution and the Victorian Era.I like the illustrations. I wanted a book with a lot of pictures, because reading about clothing without having any pictures to show the clothing is very boring. I learned some very interesting things. For instance, boys and girls were indistinguishable until age 4, when they started dressing children in gendered clothing.Also, if you were poor or workin [...]

    2. Natalie on said:

      This series is very interesting and very informational. I love that all aspects of life (upper class to servants, men, women, and children) are discussed. Some things were a bit repetitive, however. Overall, it was a very easy read and a good, interesting, book.

    3. Bunny on said:

      Totally fun to read. Good descriptions and actually pretty informative of the time period for the length of the book.

    4. Crystal on said:

      Excellent series about historical dress. I liked that it showed what the dress was for all classes of life.I would recommend.

    5. Nancy on said:

      I loved paging through this, but did not read. G loved this as context for an essay contest she's entering, and we are off to get the rest of this series from the library.

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